The Suppressed Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 68 pages of information about The Suppressed Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson.

POEMS CHIEFLY LYRICAL

    i.  The How and the Why
   ii.  The Burial of Love
  iii.  To ——­
   iv.  Song ’I’ the gloaming light’
    v.  Song ’Every day hath its night’
   vi.  Hero to Leander
  vii.  The Mystic
 viii.  The Grasshopper
   ix.  Love, Pride and Forgetfulness
    x.  Chorus ’The varied earth, the moving heaven’
   xi.  Lost Hope
  xii.  The Tears of Heaven
 xiii.  Love and Sorrow
  xiv.  To a Lady sleeping
   xv.  Sonnet ’Could I outwear my present state of woe’
  xvi.  Sonnet ’Though night hath climbed’
 xvii.  Sonnet ’Shall the hag Evil die’
xviii.  Sonnet ’The pallid thunder stricken sigh for gain’
  xix.  Love
   xx.  English War Song
  xxi.  National Song
 xxii.  Dualisms
xxiii. [Greek:  ohi rheontes]
 xxiv.  Song ’The lintwhite and the throstlecock’

CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS, 1831-32

   xxv.  A Fragment
  xxvi.  Anacreontics
 xxvii. ’O sad no more!  O sweet no more’ xxviii.  Sonnet ’Check every outflash, every ruder sally’
  xxix.  Sonnet ’Me my own fate to lasting sorrow doometh’
   xxx.  Sonnet ’There are three things that fill my heart with sighs’

POEMS, 1833

   xxxi.  Sonnet ’Oh beauty, passing beauty’
  xxxii.  The Hesperides
 xxxiii.  Rosalind
  xxxiv.  Song ’Who can say’
   xxxv.  Sonnet ’Blow ye the trumpet, gather from afar’
  xxxvi.  O Darling Room
 xxxvii.  To Christopher North
xxxviii.  The Lotos-Eaters
  xxxix.  A Dream of Fair Women

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS, 1833-68

    xl.  Cambridge
   xli.  The Germ of ‘Maud’
  xlii. ’A gate and afield half ploughed’
 xliii.  The Skipping-Rope
  xliv.  The New Timon and the Poets
   xlv.  Mablethorpe
  xlvi. ’What time I wasted youthful hours’
 xlvii.  Britons, guard your own
xlviii.  Hands all round
  xlix.  Suggested by reading an article in a newspaper
     l. ’God bless our Prince and Bride’
    li.  The Ringlet
   lii.  Song ’Home they brought him slain with spears’
  liii. 1865-1866

THE LOVER’S TALE, 1833.

INDEX OF FIRST LINES

Note

To those unacquainted with Tennyson’s conscientious methods, it may seem strange that a volume of 160 pages is necessary to contain those poems written and published by him during his active literary career, and ultimately rejected as unsatisfactory.  Of this considerable body of verse, a great part was written, not in youth or old age, but while Tennyson’s powers were at their greatest.  Whatever reasons may once have existed for suppressing the poems that follow, the student of English literature is entitled to demand that the whole body of Tennyson’s work should now be open, without restriction or impediment, to the critical study to which the works of his compeers are subjected.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Suppressed Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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