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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 554 pages of information about Great Expectations.

Many a year went round, before I was a partner in the House; but, I lived happily with Herbert and his wife, and lived frugally, and paid my debts, and maintained a constant correspondence with Biddy and Joe.  It was not until I became third in the Firm, that Clarriker betrayed me to Herbert; but, he then declared that the secret of Herbert’s partnership had been long enough upon his conscience, and he must tell it.  So, he told it, and Herbert was as much moved as amazed, and the dear fellow and I were not the worse friends for the long concealment.  I must not leave it to be supposed that we were ever a great house, or that we made mints of money.  We were not in a grand way of business, but we had a good name, and worked for our profits, and did very well.  We owed so much to Herbert’s ever cheerful industry and readiness, that I often wondered how I had conceived that old idea of his inaptitude, until I was one day enlightened by the reflection, that perhaps the inaptitude had never been in him at all, but had been in me.

Chapter 59

For eleven years, I had not seen Joe nor Biddy with my bodily eyes-though they had both been often before my fancy in the East-when, upon an evening in December, an hour or two after dark, I laid my hand softly on the latch of the old kitchen door.  I touched it so softly that I was not heard, and looked in unseen.  There, smoking his pipe in the old place by the kitchen firelight, as hale and as strong as ever though a little grey, sat Joe; and there, fenced into the corner with Joe’s leg, and sitting on my own little stool looking at the fire, was — I again!

“We giv’ him the name of Pip for your sake, dear old chap,” said Joe, delighted when I took another stool by the child’s side (but I did not rumple his hair), “and we hoped he might grow a little bit like you, and we think he do.”

I thought so too, and I took him out for a walk next morning, and we talked immensely, understanding one another to perfection.  And I took him down to the churchyard, and set him on a certain tombstone there, and he showed me from that elevation which stone was sacred to the memory of Philip Pirrip, late of this Parish, and Also Georgiana, Wife of the Above.

“Biddy,” said I, when I talked with her after dinner, as her little girl lay sleeping in her lap, “you must give Pip to me, one of these days; or lend him, at all events.”

“No, no,” said Biddy, gently.  “You must marry.”

“So Herbert and Clara say, but I don’t think I shall, Biddy.  I have so settled down in their home, that it’s not at all likely.  I am already quite an old bachelor.”

Biddy looked down at her child, and put its little hand to her lips, and then put the good matronly hand with which she had touched it, into mine.  There was something in the action and in the light pressure of Biddy’s wedding-ring, that had a very pretty eloquence in it.

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