Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 554 pages of information about Great Expectations.

“For whose sake would you reveal the secret?  For the father’s?  I think he would not be much the better for the mother.  For the mother’s?  I think if she had done such a deed she would be safer where she was.  For the daughter’s?  I think it would hardly serve her, to establish her parentage for the information of her husband, and to drag her back to disgrace, after an escape of twenty years, pretty secure to last for life.  But, add the case that you had loved her, Pip, and had made her the subject of those ‘poor dreams’ which have, at one time or another, been in the heads of more men than you think likely, then I tell you that you had better — and would much sooner when you had thought well of it — chop off that bandaged left hand of yours with your bandaged right hand, and then pass the chopper on to Wemmick there, to cut that off, too.”

I looked at Wemmick, whose face was very grave.  He gravely touched his lips with his forefinger.  I did the same.  Mr. Jaggers did the same.  “Now, Wemmick,” said the latter then, resuming his usual manner, “what item was it you were at, when Mr. Pip came in?”

Standing by for a little, while they were at work, I observed that the odd looks they had cast at one another were repeated several times:  with this difference now, that each of them seemed suspicious, not to say conscious, of having shown himself in a weak and unprofessional light to the other.  For this reason, I suppose, they were now inflexible with one another; Mr. Jaggers being highly dictatorial, and Wemmick obstinately justifying himself whenever there was the smallest point in abeyance for a moment.  I had never seen them on such ill terms; for generally they got on very well indeed together.

But, they were both happily relieved by the opportune appearance of Mike, the client with the fur cap and the habit of wiping his nose on his sleeve, whom I had seen on the very first day of my appearance within those walls.  This individual, who, either in his own person or in that of some member of his family, seemed to be always in trouble (which in that place meant Newgate), called to announce that his eldest daughter was taken up on suspicion of shop-lifting.  As he imparted this melancholy circumstance to Wemmick, Mr. Jaggers standing magisterially before the fire and taking no share in the proceedings, Mike’s eye happened to twinkle with a tear.

“What are you about?” demanded Wemmick, with the utmost indignation.  “What do you come snivelling here for?”

“I didn’t go to do it, Mr. Wemmick.”

“You did,” said Wemmick.  “How dare you?  You’re not in a fit state to come here, if you can’t come here without spluttering like a bad pen.  What do you mean by it?”

“A man can’t help his feelings, Mr. Wemmick,” pleaded Mike.

“His what?” demanded Wemmick, quite savagely.  “Say that again!”

“Now, look here my man,” said Mr. Jaggers, advancing a step, and pointing to the door.  “Get out of this office.  I’ll have no feelings here.  Get out.”

Follow Us on Facebook