Great Expectations eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 554 pages of information about Great Expectations.

At first, as I lay quiet on the sofa, I found it painfully difficult, I might say impossible, to get rid of the impression of the glare of the flames, their hurry and noise, and the fierce burning smell.  If I dozed for a minute, I was awakened by Miss Havisham’s cries, and by her running at me with all that height of fire above her head.  This pain of the mind was much harder to strive against than any bodily pain I suffered; and Herbert, seeing that, did his utmost to hold my attention engaged.

Neither of us spoke of the boat, but we both thought of it.  That was made apparent by our avoidance of the subject, and by our agreeing — without agreement — to make my recovery of the use of my hands, a question of so many hours, not of so many weeks.

My first question when I saw Herbert had been of course, whether all was well down the river?  As he replied in the affirmative, with perfect confidence and cheerfulness, we did not resume the subject until the day was wearing away.  But then, as Herbert changed the bandages, more by the light of the fire than by the outer light, he went back to it spontaneously.

“I sat with Provis last night, Handel, two good hours.”

“Where was Clara?”

“Dear little thing!” said Herbert.  “She was up and down with Gruffandgrim all the evening.  He was perpetually pegging at the floor, the moment she left his sight.  I doubt if he can hold out long though.  What with rum and pepper — and pepper and rum — I should think his pegging must be nearly over.”

“And then you will be married, Herbert?”

“How can I take care of the dear child otherwise? — Lay your arm out upon the back of the sofa, my dear boy, and I’ll sit down here, and get the bandage off so gradually that you shall not know when it comes.  I was speaking of Provis.  Do you know, Handel, he improves?”

“I said to you I thought he was softened when I last saw him.”

“So you did.  And so he is.  He was very communicative last night, and told me more of his life.  You remember his breaking off here about some woman that he had had great trouble with. — Did I hurt you?”

I had started, but not under his touch.  His words had given me a start.

“I had forgotten that, Herbert, but I remember it now you speak of it.”

“Well!  He went into that part of his life, and a dark wild part it is.  Shall I tell you?  Or would it worry you just now?”

“Tell me by all means.  Every word.”

Herbert bent forward to look at me more nearly, as if my reply had been rather more hurried or more eager than he could quite account for.  “Your head is cool?” he said, touching it.

“Quite,” said I.  “Tell me what Provis said, my dear Herbert.”

“It seems,” said Herbert, " — there’s a bandage off most charmingly, and now comes the cool one — makes you shrink at first, my poor dear fellow, don’t it? but it will be comfortable presently - it seems that the woman was a young woman, and a jealous woman, and a revengeful woman; revengeful, Handel, to the last degree.”

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Great Expectations from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.