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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 554 pages of information about Great Expectations.

Alterations have been made in that part of the Temple since that time, and it has not now so lonely a character as it had then, nor is it so exposed to the river.  We lived at the top of the last house, and the wind rushing up the river shook the house that night, like discharges of cannon, or breakings of a sea.  When the rain came with it and dashed against the windows, I thought, raising my eyes to them as they rocked, that I might have fancied myself in a storm-beaten lighthouse.  Occasionally, the smoke came rolling down the chimney as though it could not bear to go out into such a night; and when I set the doors open and looked down the staircase, the staircase lamps were blown out; and when I shaded my face with my hands and looked through the black windows (opening them ever so little, was out of the question in the teeth of such wind and rain) I saw that the lamps in the court were blown out, and that the lamps on the bridges and the shore were shuddering, and that the coal fires in barges on the river were being carried away before the wind like red-hot splashes in the rain.

I read with my watch upon the table, purposing to close my book at eleven o’clock.  As I shut it, Saint Paul’s, and all the many church-clocks in the City — some leading, some accompanying, some following — struck that hour.  The sound was curiously flawed by the wind; and I was listening, and thinking how the wind assailed and tore it, when I heard a footstep on the stair.

What nervous folly made me start, and awfully connect it with the footstep of my dead sister, matters not.  It was past in a moment, and I listened again, and heard the footstep stumble in coming on.  Remembering then, that the staircase-lights were blown out, I took up my reading-lamp and went out to the stair-head.  Whoever was below had stopped on seeing my lamp, for all was quiet.

“There is some one down there, is there not?” I called out, looking down.

“Yes,” said a voice from the darkness beneath.

“What floor do you want?”

“The top.  Mr. Pip.”

“That is my name. — There is nothing the matter?”

“Nothing the matter,” returned the voice.  And the man came on.

I stood with my lamp held out over the stair-rail, and he came slowly within its light.  It was a shaded lamp, to shine upon a book, and its circle of light was very contracted; so that he was in it for a mere instant, and then out of it.  In the instant, I had seen a face that was strange to me, looking up with an incomprehensible air of being touched and pleased by the sight of me.

Moving the lamp as the man moved, I made out that he was substantially dressed, but roughly; like a voyager by sea.  That he had long iron-grey hair.  That his age was about sixty.  That he was a muscular man, strong on his legs, and that he was browned and hardened by exposure to weather.  As he ascended the last stair or two, and the light of my lamp included us both, I saw, with a stupid kind of amazement, that he was holding out both his hands to me.

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