Great Expectations eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 554 pages of information about Great Expectations.

“If I could buy the furniture now hired for me,” said I, “and one or two other little things, I should be quite at home there.”

“Go it!” said Mr. Jaggers, with a short laugh.  “I told you you’d get on.  Well!  How much do you want?”

I said I didn’t know how much.

“Come!” retorted Mr. Jaggers.  “How much?  Fifty pounds?”

“Oh, not nearly so much.”

“Five pounds?” said Mr. Jaggers.

This was such a great fall, that I said in discomfiture, “Oh! more than that.”

“More than that, eh!” retorted Mr. Jaggers, lying in wait for me, with his hands in his pockets, his head on one side, and his eyes on the wall behind me; “how much more?”

“It is so difficult to fix a sum,” said I, hesitating.

“Come!” said Mr. Jaggers.  “Let’s get at it.  Twice five; will that do?  Three times five; will that do?  Four times five; will that do?”

I said I thought that would do handsomely.

“Four times five will do handsomely, will it?” said Mr. Jaggers, knitting his brows.  “Now, what do you make of four times five?”

“What do I make of it?”

“Ah!” said Mr. Jaggers; “how much?”

“I suppose you make it twenty pounds,” said I, smiling.

“Never mind what I make it, my friend,” observed Mr. Jaggers, with a knowing and contradictory toss of his head.  “I want to know what you make it.”

“Twenty pounds, of course.”

“Wemmick!” said Mr. Jaggers, opening his office door.  “Take Mr. Pip’s written order, and pay him twenty pounds.”

This strongly marked way of doing business made a strongly marked impression on me, and that not of an agreeable kind.  Mr. Jaggers never laughed; but he wore great bright creaking boots, and, in poising himself on these boots, with his large head bent down and his eyebrows joined together, awaiting an answer, he sometimes caused the boots to creak, as if they laughed in a dry and suspicious way.  As he happened to go out now, and as Wemmick was brisk and talkative, I said to Wemmick that I hardly knew what to make of Mr. Jaggers’s manner.

“Tell him that, and he’ll take it as a compliment,” answered Wemmick; “he don’t mean that you should know what to make of it. — Oh!” for I looked surprised, “it’s not personal; it’s professional:  only professional.”

Wemmick was at his desk, lunching — and crunching — on a dry hard biscuit; pieces of which he threw from time to time into his slit of a mouth, as if he were posting them.

“Always seems to me,” said Wemmick, “as if he had set a mantrap and was watching it.  Suddenly — click — you’re caught!”

Without remarking that mantraps were not among the amenities of life, I said I supposed he was very skilful?

“Deep,” said Wemmick, “as Australia.”  Pointing with his pen at the office floor, to express that Australia was understood, for the purposes of the figure, to be symmetrically on the opposite spot of the globe.  “If there was anything deeper,” added Wemmick, bringing his pen to paper, “he’d be it.”

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Great Expectations from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.