Forgot your password?  

The Jungle eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about The Jungle.

For three weeks after his injury Jurgis never got up from bed.  It was a very obstinate sprain; the swelling would not go down, and the pain still continued.  At the end of that time, however, he could contain himself no longer, and began trying to walk a little every day, laboring to persuade himself that he was better.  No arguments could stop him, and three or four days later he declared that he was going back to work.  He limped to the cars and got to Brown’s, where he found that the boss had kept his place—­that is, was willing to turn out into the snow the poor devil he had hired in the meantime.  Every now and then the pain would force Jurgis to stop work, but he stuck it out till nearly an hour before closing.  Then he was forced to acknowledge that he could not go on without fainting; it almost broke his heart to do it, and he stood leaning against a pillar and weeping like a child.  Two of the men had to help him to the car, and when he got out he had to sit down and wait in the snow till some one came along.

So they put him to bed again, and sent for the doctor, as they ought to have done in the beginning.  It transpired that he had twisted a tendon out of place, and could never have gotten well without attention.  Then he gripped the sides of the bed, and shut his teeth together, and turned white with agony, while the doctor pulled and wrenched away at his swollen ankle.  When finally the doctor left, he told him that he would have to lie quiet for two months, and that if he went to work before that time he might lame himself for life.

Three days later there came another heavy snowstorm, and Jonas and Marija and Ona and little Stanislovas all set out together, an hour before daybreak, to try to get to the yards.  About noon the last two came back, the boy screaming with pain.  His fingers were all frosted, it seemed.  They had had to give up trying to get to the yards, and had nearly perished in a drift.  All that they knew how to do was to hold the frozen fingers near the fire, and so little Stanislovas spent most of the day dancing about in horrible agony, till Jurgis flew into a passion of nervous rage and swore like a madman, declaring that he would kill him if he did not stop.  All that day and night the family was half-crazed with fear that Ona and the boy had lost their places; and in the morning they set out earlier than ever, after the little fellow had been beaten with a stick by Jurgis.  There could be no trifling in a case like this, it was a matter of life and death; little Stanislovas could not be expected to realize that he might a great deal better freeze in the snowdrift than lose his job at the lard machine.  Ona was quite certain that she would find her place gone, and was all unnerved when she finally got to Brown’s, and found that the forelady herself had failed to come, and was therefore compelled to be lenient.

Follow Us on Facebook