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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about The Jungle.

The victim was Tamoszius Kuszleika, who played the violin.  Everybody laughed at them, for Tamoszius was petite and frail, and Marija could have picked him up and carried him off under one arm.  But perhaps that was why she fascinated him; the sheer volume of Marija’s energy was overwhelming.  That first night at the wedding Tamoszius had hardly taken his eyes off her; and later on, when he came to find that she had really the heart of a baby, her voice and her violence ceased to terrify him, and he got the habit of coming to pay her visits on Sunday afternoons.  There was no place to entertain company except in the kitchen, in the midst of the family, and Tamoszius would sit there with his hat between his knees, never saying more than half a dozen words at a time, and turning red in the face before he managed to say those; until finally Jurgis would clap him upon the back, in his hearty way, crying, “Come now, brother, give us a tune.”  And then Tamoszius’ face would light up and he would get out his fiddle, tuck it under his chin, and play.  And forthwith the soul of him would flame up and become eloquent—­it was almost an impropriety, for all the while his gaze would be fixed upon Marija’s face, until she would begin to turn red and lower her eyes.  There was no resisting the music of Tamoszius, however; even the children would sit awed and wondering, and the tears would run down Teta Elzbieta’s cheeks.  A wonderful privilege it was to be thus admitted into the soul of a man of genius, to be allowed to share the ecstasies and the agonies of his inmost life.

Then there were other benefits accruing to Marija from this friendship—­benefits of a more substantial nature.  People paid Tamoszius big money to come and make music on state occasions; and also they would invite him to parties and festivals, knowing well that he was too good-natured to come without his fiddle, and that having brought it, he could be made to play while others danced.  Once he made bold to ask Marija to accompany him to such a party, and Marija accepted, to his great delight—­after which he never went anywhere without her, while if the celebration were given by friends of his, he would invite the rest of the family also.  In any case Marija would bring back a huge pocketful of cakes and sandwiches for the children, and stories of all the good things she herself had managed to consume.  She was compelled, at these parties, to spend most of her time at the refreshment table, for she could not dance with anybody except other women and very old men; Tamoszius was of an excitable temperament, and afflicted with a frantic jealousy, and any unmarried man who ventured to put his arm about the ample waist of Marija would be certain to throw the orchestra out of tune.

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