The Jungle eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about The Jungle.

It was a striking circumstance that Jonas, too, had gotten his job by the misfortune of some other person.  Jonas pushed a truck loaded with hams from the smoke rooms on to an elevator, and thence to the packing rooms.  The trucks were all of iron, and heavy, and they put about threescore hams on each of them, a load of more than a quarter of a ton.  On the uneven floor it was a task for a man to start one of these trucks, unless he was a giant; and when it was once started he naturally tried his best to keep it going.  There was always the boss prowling about, and if there was a second’s delay he would fall to cursing; Lithuanians and Slovaks and such, who could not understand what was said to them, the bosses were wont to kick about the place like so many dogs.  Therefore these trucks went for the most part on the run; and the predecessor of Jonas had been jammed against the wall by one and crushed in a horrible and nameless manner.

All of these were sinister incidents; but they were trifles compared to what Jurgis saw with his own eyes before long.  One curious thing he had noticed, the very first day, in his profession of shoveler of guts; which was the sharp trick of the floor bosses whenever there chanced to come a “slunk” calf.  Any man who knows anything about butchering knows that the flesh of a cow that is about to calve, or has just calved, is not fit for food.  A good many of these came every day to the packing houses—­and, of course, if they had chosen, it would have been an easy matter for the packers to keep them till they were fit for food.  But for the saving of time and fodder, it was the law that cows of that sort came along with the others, and whoever noticed it would tell the boss, and the boss would start up a conversation with the government inspector, and the two would stroll away.  So in a trice the carcass of the cow would be cleaned out, and entrails would have vanished; it was Jurgis’ task to slide them into the trap, calves and all, and on the floor below they took out these “slunk” calves, and butchered them for meat, and used even the skins of them.

One day a man slipped and hurt his leg; and that afternoon, when the last of the cattle had been disposed of, and the men were leaving, Jurgis was ordered to remain and do some special work which this injured man had usually done.  It was late, almost dark, and the government inspectors had all gone, and there were only a dozen or two of men on the floor.  That day they had killed about four thousand cattle, and these cattle had come in freight trains from far states, and some of them had got hurt.  There were some with broken legs, and some with gored sides; there were some that had died, from what cause no one could say; and they were all to be disposed of, here in darkness and silence.  “Downers,” the men called them; and the packing house had a special elevator upon which they were raised to the killing beds, where the gang proceeded to handle them, with an air of

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The Jungle from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.