The Jungle eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about The Jungle.

The Socialists were organized in every civilized nation; it was an international political party, said Ostrinski, the greatest the world had ever known.  It numbered thirty million of adherents, and it cast eight million votes.  It had started its first newspaper in Japan, and elected its first deputy in Argentina; in France it named members of cabinets, and in Italy and Australia it held the balance of power and turned out ministries.  In Germany, where its vote was more than a third of the total vote of the empire, all other parties and powers had united to fight it.  It would not do, Ostrinski explained, for the proletariat of one nation to achieve the victory, for that nation would be crushed by the military power of the others; and so the Socialist movement was a world movement, an organization of all mankind to establish liberty and fraternity.  It was the new religion of humanity—­or you might say it was the fulfillment of the old religion, since it implied but the literal application of all the teachings of Christ.

Until long after midnight Jurgis sat lost in the conversation of his new acquaintance.  It was a most wonderful experience to him—­an almost supernatural experience.  It was like encountering an inhabitant of the fourth dimension of space, a being who was free from all one’s own limitations.  For four years, now, Jurgis had been wondering and blundering in the depths of a wilderness; and here, suddenly, a hand reached down and seized him, and lifted him out of it, and set him upon a mountain-top, from which he could survey it all—­could see the paths from which he had wandered, the morasses into which he had stumbled, the hiding places of the beasts of prey that had fallen upon him.  There were his Packingtown experiences, for instance—­what was there about Packingtown that Ostrinski could not explain!  To Jurgis the packers had been equivalent to fate; Ostrinski showed him that they were the Beef Trust.  They were a gigantic combination of capital, which had crushed all opposition, and overthrown the laws of the land, and was preying upon the people.  Jurgis recollected how, when he had first come to Packingtown, he had stood and watched the hog-killing, and thought how cruel and savage it was, and come away congratulating himself that he was not a hog; now his new acquaintance showed him that a hog was just what he had been—­one of the packers’ hogs.  What they wanted from a hog was all the profits that could be got out of him; and that was what they wanted from the workingman, and also that was what they wanted from the public.  What the hog thought of it, and what he suffered, were not considered; and no more was it with labor, and no more with the purchaser of meat.  That was true everywhere in the world, but it was especially true in Packingtown; there seemed to be something about the work of slaughtering that tended to ruthlessness and ferocity—­it was literally the fact that in the methods of the packers a hundred human lives did not balance a penny

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The Jungle from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.