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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about The Jungle.

Later that afternoon he and Ona went out to take a walk and look about them, to see more of this district which was to be their home.  In back of the yards the dreary two-story frame houses were scattered farther apart, and there were great spaces bare—­that seemingly had been overlooked by the great sore of a city as it spread itself over the surface of the prairie.  These bare places were grown up with dingy, yellow weeds, hiding innumerable tomato cans; innumerable children played upon them, chasing one another here and there, screaming and fighting.  The most uncanny thing about this neighborhood was the number of the children; you thought there must be a school just out, and it was only after long acquaintance that you were able to realize that there was no school, but that these were the children of the neighborhood—­that there were so many children to the block in Packingtown that nowhere on its streets could a horse and buggy move faster than a walk!

It could not move faster anyhow, on account of the state of the streets.  Those through which Jurgis and Ona were walking resembled streets less than they did a miniature topographical map.  The roadway was commonly several feet lower than the level of the houses, which were sometimes joined by high board walks; there were no pavements—­there were mountains and valleys and rivers, gullies and ditches, and great hollows full of stinking green water.  In these pools the children played, and rolled about in the mud of the streets; here and there one noticed them digging in it, after trophies which they had stumbled on.  One wondered about this, as also about the swarms of flies which hung about the scene, literally blackening the air, and the strange, fetid odor which assailed one’s nostrils, a ghastly odor, of all the dead things of the universe.  It impelled the visitor to questions and then the residents would explain, quietly, that all this was “made” land, and that it had been “made” by using it as a dumping ground for the city garbage.  After a few years the unpleasant effect of this would pass away, it was said; but meantime, in hot weather—­and especially when it rained—­the flies were apt to be annoying.  Was it not unhealthful? the stranger would ask, and the residents would answer, “Perhaps; but there is no telling.”

A little way farther on, and Jurgis and Ona, staring open-eyed and wondering, came to the place where this “made” ground was in process of making.  Here was a great hole, perhaps two city blocks square, and with long files of garbage wagons creeping into it.  The place had an odor for which there are no polite words; and it was sprinkled over with children, who raked in it from dawn till dark.  Sometimes visitors from the packing houses would wander out to see this “dump,” and they would stand by and debate as to whether the children were eating the food they got, or merely collecting it for the chickens at home.  Apparently none of them ever went down to find out.

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