The Jungle eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about The Jungle.

Christmas Eve—­he had forgotten it entirely!  There was a breaking of floodgates, a whirl of new memories and new griefs rushing into his mind.  In far Lithuania they had celebrated Christmas; and it came to him as if it had been yesterday—­himself a little child, with his lost brother and his dead father in the cabin—­in the deep black forest, where the snow fell all day and all night and buried them from the world.  It was too far off for Santa Claus in Lithuania, but it was not too far for peace and good will to men, for the wonder-bearing vision of the Christ Child.  And even in Packingtown they had not forgotten it—­some gleam of it had never failed to break their darkness.  Last Christmas Eve and all Christmas Day Jurgis had toiled on the killing beds, and Ona at wrapping hams, and still they had found strength enough to take the children for a walk upon the avenue, to see the store windows all decorated with Christmas trees and ablaze with electric lights.  In one window there would be live geese, in another marvels in sugar—­pink and white canes big enough for ogres, and cakes with cherubs upon them; in a third there would be rows of fat yellow turkeys, decorated with rosettes, and rabbits and squirrels hanging; in a fourth would be a fairyland of toys—­lovely dolls with pink dresses, and woolly sheep and drums and soldier hats.  Nor did they have to go without their share of all this, either.  The last time they had had a big basket with them and all their Christmas marketing to do—­a roast of pork and a cabbage and some rye bread, and a pair of mittens for Ona, and a rubber doll that squeaked, and a little green cornucopia full of candy to be hung from the gas jet and gazed at by half a dozen pairs of longing eyes.

Even half a year of the sausage machines and the fertilizer mill had not been able to kill the thought of Christmas in them; there was a choking in Jurgis’ throat as he recalled that the very night Ona had not come home Teta Elzbieta had taken him aside and shown him an old valentine that she had picked up in a paper store for three cents—­dingy and shopworn, but with bright colors, and figures of angels and doves.  She had wiped all the specks off this, and was going to set it on the mantel, where the children could see it.  Great sobs shook Jurgis at this memory—­they would spend their Christmas in misery and despair, with him in prison and Ona ill and their home in desolation.  Ah, it was too cruel!  Why at least had they not left him alone—­why, after they had shut him in jail, must they be ringing Christmas chimes in his ears!

But no, their bells were not ringing for him—­their Christmas was not meant for him, they were simply not counting him at all.  He was of no consequence—­he was flung aside, like a bit of trash, the carcass of some animal.  It was horrible, horrible!  His wife might be dying, his baby might be starving, his whole family might be perishing in the cold—­and all the while they were ringing their Christmas chimes! 

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Project Gutenberg
The Jungle from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.