Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

“Who?” she asked herself.  “All or one?” And not assisting the harassed young man she was dancing with in the conversation, the thread of which he had lost and could not pick up again, she obeyed with external liveliness the peremptory shouts of Korsunsky starting them all into the grand rond, and then into the chaine, and at the same time she kept watch with a growing pang at her heart.  “No, it’s not the admiration of the crowd has intoxicated her, but the adoration of one.  And that one? can it be he?” Every time he spoke to Anna the joyous light flashed into her eyes, and the smile of happiness curved her red lips. she seemed to make an effort to control herself, to try not to show these signs of delight, but they came out on her face of themselves.  “But what of him?” Kitty looked at him and was filled with terror.  What was pictured so clearly to Kitty in the mirror of Anna’s face she saw in him.  What had become of his always self-possessed resolute manner, and the carelessly serene expression of his face?  Now every time he turned to her, he bent his head, as though he would have fallen at her feet, and in his eyes there was nothing but humble submission and dread.  “I would not offend you,” his eyes seemed every time to be saying, “but I want to save myself, and I don’t know how.”  On his face was a look such as Kitty had never seen before.

They were speaking of common acquaintances, keeping up the most trivial conversation, but to Kitty it seemed that every word they said was determining their fate and hers.  And strange it was that they were actually talking of how absurd Ivan Ivanovitch was with his French, and how the Eletsky girl might have made a better match, yet these words had all the while consequence for them, and they were feeling just as Kitty did.  The whole ball, the whole world, everything seemed lost in fog in Kitty’s soul.  Nothing but the stern discipline of her bringing-up supported her and forced her to do what was expected of her, that is, to dance, to answer questions, to talk, even to smile.  But before the mazurka, when they were beginning to rearrange the chairs and a few couples moved out of the smaller rooms into the big room, a moment of despair and horror came for Kitty.  She had refused five partners, and now she was not dancing the mazurka.  She had not even a hope of being asked for it, because she was so successful in society that the idea would never occur to anyone that she had remained disengaged till now.  She would have to tell her mother she felt ill and go home, but she had not the strength to do this.  She felt crushed.  She went to the furthest end of the little drawing room and sank into a low chair.  Her light, transparent skirts rose like a cloud about her slender waist; one bare, thin, soft, girlish arm, hanging listlessly, was lost in the folds of her pink tunic; in the other she held her fan, and with rapid, short strokes fanned her burning face.  But while she looked like a butterfly, clinging to a blade of grass, and just about to open its rainbow wings for fresh flight, her heart ached with a horrible despair.

Follow Us on Facebook