Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

And Korsunsky began waltzing with measured steps straight towards the group in the left corner, continually saying, “Pardon, mesdames, pardon, pardon, mesdames”; and steering his course through the sea of lace, tulle, and ribbon, and not disarranging a feather, he turned his partner sharply round, so that her slim ankles, in light transparent stockings, were exposed to view, and her train floated out in fan shape and covered Krivin’s knees.  Korsunsky bowed, set straight his open shirt front, and gave her his arm to conduct her to Anna Arkadyevna.  Kitty, flushed, took her train from Krivin’s knees, and, a little giddy, looked round, seeking Anna.  Anna was not in lilac, as Kitty had so urgently wished, but in a black, low-cut, velvet gown, showing her full throat and shoulders, that looked as though carved in old ivory, and her rounded arms, with tiny, slender wrists.  The whole gown was trimmed with Venetian guipure.  On her head, among her black hair—­her own, with no false additions—­was a little wreath of pansies, and a bouquet of the same in the black ribbon of her sash among white lace.  Her coiffure was not striking.  All that was noticeable was the little wilful tendrils of her curly hair that would always break free about her neck and temples.  Round her well-cut, strong neck was a thread of pearls.

Kitty had been seeing Anna every day; she adored her, and had pictured her invariably in lilac.  But now seeing her in black, she felt that she had not fully seen her charm.  She saw her now as someone quite new and surprising to her.  Now she understood that Anna could not have been in lilac, and that her charm was just that she always stood out against her attire, that her dress could never be noticeable on her.  And her black dress, with its sumptuous lace, was not noticeable on her; it was only the frame, and all that was seen was she—­simple, natural, elegant, and at the same time gay and eager.

She was standing holding herself, as always, very erect, and when Kitty drew near the group she was speaking to the master of the house, her head slightly turned towards him.

“No, I don’t throw stones,” she was saying, in answer to something, “though I can’t understand it,” she went on, shrugging her shoulders, and she turned at once with a soft smile of protection towards Kitty.  With a flying, feminine glance she scanned her attire, and made a movement of her head, hardly perceptible, but understood by Kitty, signifying approval of her dress and her looks.  “You came into the room dancing,” she added.

“This is one of my most faithful supporters,” said Korsunsky, bowing to Anna Arkadyevna, whom he had not yet seen.  “The princess helps to make balls happy and successful.  Anna Arkadyevna, a waltz?” he said, bending down to her.

“Why, have you met?” inquired their host.

“Is there anyone we have not met?  My wife and I are like white wolves—­everyone knows us,” answered Korsunsky.  “A waltz, Anna Arkadyevna?”

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.