Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

Levin did not answer, and they walked together into the big room.

The marshal of the province, though he was vaguely conscious in the air of some trap being prepared for him, and though he had not been called upon by all to stand, had still made up his mind to stand.  All was silence in the room.  The secretary announced in a loud voice that the captain of the guards, Mihail Stepanovitch Snetkov, would now be balloted for as marshal of the province.

The district marshals walked carrying plates, on which were balls, from their tables to the high table, and the election began.

“Put it in the right side,” whispered Stepan Arkadyevitch, as with his brother Levin followed the marshal of his district to the table.  But Levin had forgotten by now the calculations that had been explained to him, and was afraid Stepan Arkadyevitch might be mistaken in saying “the right side.”  Surely Snetkov was the enemy.  As he went up, he held the ball in his right hand, but thinking he was wrong, just at the box he changed to the left hand, and undoubtedly put the ball to the left.  An adept in the business, standing at the box and seeing by the mere action of the elbow where each put his ball, scowled with annoyance.  It was no good for him to use his insight.

Everything was still, and the counting of the balls was heard.  Then a single voice rose and proclaimed the numbers for and against.  The marshal had been voted for by a considerable majority.  All was noise and eager movement towards the doors.  Snetkov came in, and the nobles thronged round him, congratulating him.

“Well, now is it over?” Levin asked Sergey Ivanovitch.

“It’s only just beginning,” Sviazhsky said, replying for Sergey Ivanovitch with a smile.  “Some other candidate may receive more votes than the marshal.”

Levin had quite forgotten about that.  Now he could only remember that there was some sort of trickery in it, but he was too bored to think what it was exactly.  He felt depressed, and longed to get out of the crowd.

As no one was paying any attention to him, and no one apparently needed him, he quietly slipped away into the little room where the refreshments were, and again had a great sense of comfort when he saw the waiters.  The little old waiter pressed him to have something, and Levin agreed.  After eating a cutlet with beans and talking to the waiters of their former masters, Levin, not wishing to go back to the hall, where it was all so distasteful to him, proceeded to walk through the galleries.  The galleries were full of fashionably dressed ladies, leaning over the balustrade and trying not to lose a single word of what was being said below.  With the ladies were sitting and standing smart lawyers, high school teachers in spectacles, and officers.  Everywhere they were talking of the election, and of how worried the marshal was, and how splendid the discussions had been.  In one group Levin heard his brother’s praises.  One lady was telling a lawyer: 

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.