Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

The most solemn moment was at hand.  They were to proceed immediately to the election.  The leaders of both parties were reckoning white and black on their fingers.

The discussion upon Flerov had given the new party not only Flerov’s vote, but had also gained time for them, so that they could send to fetch three noblemen who had been rendered unable to take part in the elections by the wiles of the other party.  Two noble gentlemen, who had a weakness for strong drink, had been made drunk by the partisans of Snetkov, and a third had been robbed of his uniform.

On learning this, the new party had made haste, during the dispute about Flerov, to send some of their men in a sledge to clothe the stripped gentleman, and to bring along one of the intoxicated to the meeting.

“I’ve brought one, drenched him with water,” said the landowner, who had gone on this errand, to Sviazhsky.  “He’s all right? he’ll do.”

“Not too drunk, he won’t fall down?” said Sviazhsky, shaking his head.

“No, he’s first-rate.  If only they don’t give him any more here....  I’ve told the waiter not to give him anything on any account.”

Chapter 29

The narrow room, in which they were smoking and taking refreshments, was full of noblemen.  The excitement grew more intense, and every face betrayed some uneasiness.  The excitement was specially keen for the leaders of each party, who knew every detail, and had reckoned up every vote.  They were the generals organizing the approaching battle.  The rest, like the rank and file before an engagement, though they were getting ready for the fight, sought for other distractions in the interval.  Some were lunching, standing at the bar, or sitting at the table; others were walking up and down the long room, smoking cigarettes, and talking with friends whom they had not seen for a long while.

Levin did not care to eat, and he was not smoking; he did not want to join his own friends, that is Sergey Ivanovitch, Stepan Arkadyevitch, Sviazhsky and the rest, because Vronsky in his equerry’s uniform was standing with them in eager conversation.  Levin had seen him already at the meeting on the previous day, and he had studiously avoided him, not caring to greet him.  He went to the window and sat down, scanning the groups, and listening to what was being said around him.  He felt depressed, especially because everyone else was, as he saw, eager, anxious, and interested, and he alone, with an old, toothless little man with mumbling lips wearing a naval uniform, sitting beside him, had no interest in it and nothing to do.

“He’s such a blackguard!  I have told him so, but it makes no difference.  Only think of it!  He couldn’t collect it in three years!” he heard vigorously uttered by a round-shouldered, short, country gentleman, who had pomaded hair hanging on his embroidered collar, and new boots obviously put on for the occasion, with heels that tapped energetically as he spoke.  Casting a displeased glance at Levin, this gentleman sharply turned his back.

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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