Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

“What is it? eh? whom?” “No guarantee? whose? what?” “They won’t pass him?” “No guarantee?” “They won’t let Flerov in?” “Eh, because of the charge against him?” “Why, at this rate, they won’t admit anyone.  It’s a swindle!” “The law!” Levin heard exclamations on all sides, and he moved into the big room together with the others, all hurrying somewhere and afraid of missing something.  Squeezed by the crowding noblemen, he drew near the high table where the marshal of the province, Sviazhsky, and the other leaders were hotly disputing about something.

Chapter 28

Levin was standing rather far off.  A nobleman breathing heavily and hoarsely at his side, and another whose thick boots were creaking, prevented him from hearing distinctly.  He could only hear the soft voice of the marshal faintly, then the shrill voice of the malignant gentleman, and then the voice of Sviazhsky.  They were disputing, as far as he could make out, as to the interpretation to be put on the act and the exact meaning of the words:  “liable to be called up for trial.”

The crowd parted to make way for Sergey Ivanovitch approaching the table.  Sergey Ivanovitch, waiting till the malignant gentleman had finished speaking, said that he thought the best solution would be to refer to the act itself, and asked the secretary to find the act.  The act said that in case of difference of opinion, there must be a ballot.

Sergey Ivanovitch read the act and began to explain its meaning, but at that point a tall, stout, round-shouldered landowner, with dyed whiskers, in a tight uniform that cut the back of his neck, interrupted him.  He went up to the table, and striking it with his finger ring, he shouted loudly:  “A ballot!  Put it to the vote!  No need for more talking!” Then several voices began to talk all at once, and the tall nobleman with the ring, getting more and more exasperated, shouted more and more loudly.  But it was impossible to make out what he said.

He was shouting for the very course Sergey Ivanovitch had proposed; but it was evident that he hated him and all his party, and this feeling of hatred spread through the whole party and roused in opposition to it the same vindictiveness, though in a more seemly form, on the other side.  Shouts were raised, and for a moment all was confusion, so that the marshal of the province had to call for order.

“A ballot!  A ballot!  Every nobleman sees it!  We shed our blood for our country!...  The confidence of the monarch....  No checking the accounts of the marshal; he’s not a cashier....  But that’s not the point....  Votes, please!  Beastly!...” shouted furious and violent voices on all sides.  Looks and faces were even more violent and furious than their words.  They expressed the most implacable hatred.  Levin did not in the least understand what was the matter, and he marveled at the passion with which it was disputed whether

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.