Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.
as an element of the district council, to extract all the powers of self-government that could possibly be derived from them.  In the wealthy Kashinsky province, which always took the lead of other provinces in everything, there was now such a preponderance of forces that this policy, once carried through properly there, might serve as a model for other provinces for all Russia.  And hence the whole question was of the greatest importance.  It was proposed to elect as marshal in place of Snetkov either Sviazhsky, or, better still, Nevyedovsky, a former university professor, a man of remarkable intelligence and a great friend of Sergey Ivanovitch.

The meeting was opened by the governor, who made a speech to the nobles, urging them to elect the public functionaries, not from regard for persons, but for the service and welfare of their fatherland, and hoping that the honorable nobility of the Kashinsky province would, as at all former elections, hold their duty as sacred, and vindicate the exalted confidence of the monarch.

When he had finished with his speech, the governor walked out of the hall, and the noblemen noisily and eagerly—­some even enthusiastically—­followed him and thronged round him while he put on his fur coat and conversed amicably with the marshal of the province.  Levin, anxious to see into everything and not to miss anything, stood there too in the crowd, and heard the governor say:  “Please tell Marya Ivanovna my wife is very sorry she couldn’t come to the Home.”  And thereupon the nobles in high good-humor sorted out their fur coats and all drove off to the cathedral.

In the cathedral Levin, lifting his hand like the rest and repeating the words of the archdeacon, swore with most terrible oaths to do all the governor had hoped they would do.  Church services always affected Levin, and as he uttered the words “I kiss the cross,” and glanced round at the crowd of young and old men repeating the same, he felt touched.

On the second and third days there was business relating to the finances of the nobility and the female high school, of no importance whatever, as Sergey Ivanovitch explained, and Levin, busy seeing after his own affairs, did not attend the meetings.  On the fourth day the auditing of the marshal’s accounts took place at the high table of the marshal of the province.  And then there occurred the first skirmish between the new party and the old.  The committee who had been deputed to verify the accounts reported to the meeting that all was in order.  The marshal of the province got up, thanked the nobility for their confidence, and shed tears.  The nobles gave him a loud welcome, and shook hands with him.  But at that instant a nobleman of Sergey Ivanovitch’s party said that he had heard that the committee had not verified the accounts, considering such a verification an insult to the marshal of the province.  One of the members of the committee incautiously admitted

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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