Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

Darya Alexandrovna made no answer, and merely stared at him with dismay.  When she was left alone with him, she suddenly felt afraid; his laughing eyes and stern expression scared her.

The most diverse suppositions as to what he was about to speak of to her flashed into her brain.  “He is going to beg me to come to stay with them with the children, and I shall have to refuse; or to create a set that will receive Anna in Moscow....  Or isn’t it Vassenka Veslovsky and his relations with Anna?  Or perhaps about Kitty, that he feels he was to blame?” All her conjectures were unpleasant, but she did not guess what he really wanted to talk about to her.

“You have so much influence with Anna, she is so fond of you,” he said; “do help me.”

Darya Alexandrovna looked with timid inquiry into his energetic face, which under the lime-trees was continually being lighted up in patches by the sunshine, and then passing into complete shadow again.  She waited for him to say more, but he walked in silence beside her, scratching with his cane in the gravel.

“You have come to see us, you, the only woman of Anna’s former friends—­I don’t count Princess Varvara—­but I know that you have done this not because you regard our position as normal, but because, understanding all the difficulty of the position, you still love her and want to be a help to her.  Have I understood you rightly?” he asked, looking round at her.

“Oh, yes,” answered Darya Alexandrovna, putting down her sunshade, “but...”

“No,” he broke in, and unconsciously, oblivious of the awkward position into which he was putting his companion, he stopped abruptly, so that she had to stop short too.  “No one feels more deeply and intensely than I do all the difficulty of Anna’s position; and that you may well understand, if you do me the honor of supposing I have any heart.  I am to blame for that position, and that is why I feel it.”

“I understand,” said Darya Alexandrovna, involuntarily admiring the sincerity and firmness with which he said this.  “But just because you feel yourself responsible, you exaggerate it, I am afraid,” she said.  “Her position in the world is difficult, I can well understand.”

“In the world it is hell!” he brought out quickly, frowning darkly.  “You can’t imagine moral sufferings greater than what she went through in Petersburg in that fortnight...and I beg you to believe it.”

“Yes, but here, so long as neither Anna...nor you miss society...”

“Society!” he said contemptuously, “how could I miss society?”

“So far—­and it may be so always—­you are happy and at peace.  I see in Anna that she is happy, perfectly happy, she has had time to tell me so much already,” said Darya Alexandrovna, smiling; and involuntarily, as she said this, at the same moment a doubt entered her mind whether Anna really were happy.

But Vronsky, it appeared, had no doubts on that score.

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Project Gutenberg
Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.