Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

He had sketched this new pose, when all at once he recalled the face of a shopkeeper of whom he had bought cigars, a vigorous face with a prominent chin, and he sketched this very face, this chin on to the figure of the man.  He laughed aloud with delight.  The figure from a lifeless imagined thing had become living, and such that it could never be changed.  That figure lived, and was clearly and unmistakably defined.  The sketch might be corrected in accordance with the requirements of the figure, the legs, indeed, could and must be put differently, and the position of the left hand must be quite altered; the hair too might be thrown back.  But in making these corrections he was not altering the figure but simply getting rid of what concealed the figure.  He was, as it were, stripping off the wrappings which hindered it from being distinctly seen.  Each new feature only brought out the whole figure in all its force and vigor, as it had suddenly come to him from the spot of tallow.  He was carefully finishing the figure when the cards were brought him.

“Coming, coming!”

He went in to his wife.

“Come, Sasha, don’t be cross!” he said, smiling timidly and affectionately at her.  “You were to blame.  I was to blame.  I’ll make it all right.”  And having made peace with his wife he put on an olive-green overcoat with a velvet collar and a hat, and went towards his studio.  The successful figure he had already forgotten.  Now he was delighted and excited at the visit of these people of consequence, Russians, who had come in their carriage.

Of his picture, the one that stood now on his easel, he had at the bottom of his heart one conviction—­that no one had ever painted a picture like it.  He did not believe that his picture was better than all the pictures of Raphael, but he knew that what he tried to convey in that picture, no one ever had conveyed.  This he knew positively, and had known a long while, ever since he had begun to paint it.  But other people’s criticisms, whatever they might be, had yet immense consequence in his eyes, and they agitated him to the depths of his soul.  Any remark, the most insignificant, that showed that the critic saw even the tiniest part of what he saw in the picture, agitated him to the depths of his soul.  He always attributed to his critics a more profound comprehension than he had himself, and always expected from them something he did not himself see in the picture.  And often in their criticisms he fancied that he had found this.

He walked rapidly to the door of his studio, and in spite of his excitement he was struck by the soft light on Anna’s figure as she stood in the shade of the entrance listening to Golenishtchev, who was eagerly telling her something, while she evidently wanted to look round at the artist.  He was himself unconscious how, as he approached them, he seized on this impression and absorbed it, as he had the chin

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.