Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

“With me?  Happiness is the matter with me!” said Levin, letting down the window of the carriage they were driving in.  “You don’t mind?—­it’s so stifling.  It’s happiness is the matter with me!  Why is it you have never married?”

Sergey Ivanovitch smiled.

“I am very glad, she seems a nice gi...”  Sergey Ivanovitch was beginning.

“Don’t say it! don’t say it!” shouted Levin, clutching at the collar of his fur coat with both hands, and muffling him up in it.  “She’s a nice girl” were such simple, humble words, so out of harmony with his feeling.

Sergey Ivanovitch laughed outright a merry laugh, which was rare with him.  “Well, anyway, I may say that I’m very glad of it.”

“That you may do tomorrow, tomorrow and nothing more!  Nothing, nothing, silence,” said Levin, and muffling him once more in his fur coat, he added:  “I do like you so!  Well, is it possible for me to be present at the meeting?”

“Of course it is.”

“What is your discussion about today?” asked Levin, never ceasing smiling.

They arrived at the meeting.  Levin heard the secretary hesitatingly read the minutes which he obviously did not himself understand; but Levin saw from this secretary’s face what a good, nice, kind-hearted person he was.  This was evident from his confusion and embarrassment in reading the minutes.  Then the discussion began.  They were disputing about the misappropriation of certain sums and the laying of certain pipes, and Sergey Ivanovitch was very cutting to two members, and said something at great length with an air of triumph; and another member, scribbling something on a bit of paper, began timidly at first, but afterwards answered him very viciously and delightfully.  And then Sviazhsky (he was there too) said something too, very handsomely and nobly.  Levin listened to them, and saw clearly that these missing sums and these pipes were not anything real, and that they were not at all angry, but were all the nicest, kindest people, and everything was as happy and charming as possible among them.  They did no harm to anyone, and were all enjoying it.  What struck Levin was that he could see through them all today, and from little, almost imperceptible signs knew the soul of each, and saw distinctly that they were all good at heart.  And Levin himself in particular they were all extremely fond of that day.  That was evident from the way they spoke to him, from the friendly, affectionate way even those he did not know looked at him.

“Well, did you like it?” Sergey Ivanovitch asked him.

“Very much.  I never supposed it was so interesting!  Capital!  Splendid!”

Sviazhsky went up to Levin and invited him to come round to tea with him.  Levin was utterly at a loss to comprehend or recall what it was he had disliked in Sviazhsky, what he had failed to find in him.  He was a clever and wonderfully good-hearted man.

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Project Gutenberg
Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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