Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

Though Anna had obstinately and with exasperation contradicted Vronsky when he told her their position was impossible, at the bottom of her heart she regarded her own position as false and dishonorable, and she longed with her whole soul to change it.  On the way home from the races she had told her husband the truth in a moment of excitement, and in spite of the agony she had suffered in doing so, she was glad of it.  After her husband had left her, she told herself that she was glad, that now everything was made clear, and at least there would be no more lying and deception.  It seemed to her beyond doubt that her position was now made clear forever.  It might be bad, this new position, but it would be clear; there would be no indefiniteness or falsehood about it.  The pain she had caused herself and her husband in uttering those words would be rewarded now by everything being made clear, she thought.  That evening she saw Vronsky, but she did not tell him of what had passed between her and her husband, though, to make the position definite, it was necessary to tell him.

When she woke up next morning the first thing that rose to her mind was what she had said to her husband, and those words seemed to her so awful that she could not conceive now how she could have brought herself to utter those strange, coarse words, and could not imagine what would come of it.  But the words were spoken, and Alexey Alexandrovitch had gone away without saying anything.  “I saw Vronsky and did not tell him.  At the very instant he was going away I would have turned him back and told him, but I changed my mind, because it was strange that I had not told him the first minute.  Why was it I wanted to tell him and did not tell him?” And in answer to this question a burning blush of shame spread over her face.  She knew what had kept her from it, she knew that she had been ashamed.  Her position, which had seemed to her simplified the night before, suddenly struck her now as not only not simple, but as absolutely hopeless.  She felt terrified at the disgrace, of which she had not ever thought before.  Directly she thought of what her husband would do, the most terrible ideas came to her mind.  She had a vision of being turned out of the house, of her shame being proclaimed to all the world.  She asked herself where she should go when she was turned out of the house, and she could not find an answer.

When she thought of Vronsky, it seemed to her that he did not love her, that he was already beginning to be tired of her, that she could not offer herself to him, and she felt bitter against him for it.  It seemed to her that the words that she had spoken to her husband, and had continually repeated in her imagination, she had said to everyone, and everyone had heard them.  She could not bring herself to look those of her own household in the face.  She could not bring herself to call her maid, and still less go downstairs and see her son and his governess.

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Project Gutenberg
Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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