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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

He knew she was there by the rapture and the terror that seized on his heart.  She was standing talking to a lady at the opposite end of the ground.  There was apparently nothing striking either in her dress or her attitude.  But for Levin she was as easy to find in that crowd as a rose among nettles.  Everything was made bright by her.  She was the smile that shed light on all round her.  “Is it possible I can go over there on the ice, go up to her?” he thought.  The place where she stood seemed to him a holy shrine, unapproachable, and there was one moment when he was almost retreating, so overwhelmed was he with terror.  He had to make an effort to master himself, and to remind himself that people of all sorts were moving about her, and that he too might come there to skate.  He walked down, for a long while avoiding looking at her as at the sun, but seeing her, as one does the sun, without looking.

On that day of the week and at that time of day people of one set, all acquainted with one another, used to meet on the ice.  There were crack skaters there, showing off their skill, and learners clinging to chairs with timid, awkward movements, boys, and elderly people skating with hygienic motives.  They seemed to Levin an elect band of blissful beings because they were here, near her.  All the skaters, it seemed, with perfect self-possession, skated towards her, skated by her, even spoke to her, and were happy, quite apart from her, enjoying the capital ice and the fine weather.

Nikolay Shtcherbatsky, Kitty’s cousin, in a short jacket and tight trousers, was sitting on a garden seat with his skates on.  Seeing Levin, he shouted to him: 

“Ah, the first skater in Russia!  Been here long?  First-rate ice—­do put your skates on.”

“I haven’t got my skates,” Levin answered, marveling at this boldness and ease in her presence, and not for one second losing sight of her, though he did not look at her.  He felt as though the sun were coming near him.  She was in a corner, and turning out her slender feet in their high boots with obvious timidity, she skated towards him.  A boy in Russian dress, desperately waving his arms and bowed down to the ground, overtook her.  She skated a little uncertainly; taking her hands out of the little muff that hung on a cord, she held them ready for emergency, and looking towards Levin, whom she had recognized, she smiled at him, and at her own fears.  When she had got round the turn, she gave herself a push off with one foot, and skated straight up to Shtcherbatsky.  Clutching at his arm, she nodded smiling to Levin.  She was more splendid than he had imagined her.

When he thought of her, he could call up a vivid picture of her to himself, especially the charm of that little fair head, so freely set on the shapely girlish shoulders, and so full of childish brightness and good humor.  The childishness of her expression, together with the delicate beauty of her figure, made up her special charm, and that he fully realized.  But what always struck him in her as something unlooked for, was the expression of her eyes, soft, serene, and truthful, and above all, her smile, which always transported Levin to an enchanted world, where he felt himself softened and tender, as he remembered himself in some days of his early childhood.

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