Anna Karenina eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

“At our last conversation, I notified you of my intention to communicate to you my decision in regard to the subject of that conversation.  Having carefully considered everything, I am writing now with the object of fulfilling that promise.  My decision is as follows.  Whatever your conduct may have been, I do not consider myself justified in breaking the ties in which we are bound by a Higher Power.  The family cannot be broken up by a whim, a caprice, or even by the sin of one of the partners in the marriage, and our life must go on as it has done in the past.  This is essential for me, for you, and for our son.  I am fully persuaded that you have repented and do repent of what has called forth the present letter, and that you will cooperate with me in eradicating the cause of our estrangement, and forgetting the past.  In the contrary event, you can conjecture what awaits you and your son.  All this I hope to discuss more in detail in a personal interview.  As the season is drawing to a close, I would beg you to return to Petersburg as quickly as possible, not later than Tuesday.  All necessary preparations shall be made for your arrival here.  I beg you to note that I attach particular significance to compliance with this request.

A. Karenin

“P.S.—­I enclose the money which may be needed for your expenses.”

He read the letter through and felt pleased with it, and especially that he had remembered to enclose money:  there was not a harsh word, not a reproach in it, nor was there undue indulgence.  Most of all, it was a golden bridge for return.  Folding the letter and smoothing it with a massive ivory knife, and putting it in an envelope with the money, he rang the bell with the gratification it always afforded him to use the well arranged appointments of his writing-table.

“Give this to the courier to be delivered to Anna Arkadyevna tomorrow at the summer villa,” he said, getting up.

“Certainly, your excellency; tea to be served in the study?”

Alexey Alexandrovitch ordered tea to be brought to the study, and playing with the massive paper-knife, he moved to his easy chair, near which there had been placed ready for him a lamp and the French work on Egyptian hieroglyphics that he had begun.  Over the easy chair there hung in a gold frame an oval portrait of Anna, a fine painting by a celebrated artist.  Alexey Alexandrovitch glanced at it.  The unfathomable eyes gazed ironically and insolently at him.  Insufferably insolent and challenging was the effect in Alexey Alexandrovitch’s eyes of the black lace about the head, admirably touched in by the painter, the black hair and handsome white hand with one finger lifted, covered with rings.  After looking at the portrait for a minute, Alexey Alexandrovitch shuddered so that his lips quivered and he uttered the sound “brrr,” and turned away.  He made haste to sit down in his easy chair and opened the book.  He tried to read, but he could not revive

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Anna Karenina from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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