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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

Sergey Ivanovitch Koznishev wanted a rest from mental work, and instead of going abroad as he usually did, he came towards the end of May to stay in the country with his brother.  In his judgment the best sort of life was a country life.  He had come now to enjoy such a life at his brother’s.  Konstantin Levin was very glad to have him, especially as he did not expect his brother Nikolay that summer.  But in spite of his affection and respect for Sergey Ivanovitch, Konstantin Levin was uncomfortable with his brother in the country.  It made him uncomfortable, and it positively annoyed him to see his brother’s attitude to the country.  To Konstantin Levin the country was the background of life, that is of pleasures, endeavors, labor.  To Sergey Ivanovitch the country meant on one hand rest from work, on the other a valuable antidote to the corrupt influences of town, which he took with satisfaction and a sense of its utility.  To Konstantin Levin the country was good first because it afforded a field for labor, of the usefulness of which there could be no doubt.  To Sergey Ivanovitch the country was particularly good, because there it was possible and fitting to do nothing.  Moreover, Sergey Ivanovitch’s attitude to the peasants rather piqued Konstantin.  Sergey Ivanovitch used to say that he knew and liked the peasantry, and he often talked to the peasants, which he knew how to do without affectation or condescension, and from every such conversation he would deduce general conclusions in favor of the peasantry and in confirmation of his knowing them.  Konstantin Levin did not like such an attitude to the peasants.  To Konstantin the peasant was simply the chief partner in their common labor, and in spite of all the respect and the love, almost like that of kinship, he had for the peasant—­ sucked in probably, as he said himself, with the milk of his peasant nurse—­still as a fellow-worker with him, while sometimes enthusiastic over the vigor, gentleness, and justice of these men, he was very often, when their common labors called for other qualities, exasperated with the peasant for his carelessness, lack of method, drunkenness, and lying.  If he had been asked whether he liked or didn’t like the peasants, Konstantin Levin would have been absolutely at a loss what to reply.  He liked and did not like the peasants, just as he liked and did not like men in general.  Of course, being a good-hearted man, he liked men rather than he disliked them, and so too with the peasants.  But like or dislike “the people” as something apart he could not, not only because he lived with “the people,” and all his interests were bound up with theirs, but also because he regarded himself as a part of “the people,” did not see any special qualities or failings distinguishing himself and “the people,” and could not contrast himself with them.  Moreover, although he had lived so long in the closest relations with the peasants, as farmer and arbitrator, and what

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