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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

Absorbed in such dreams, carefully keeping his horse by the hedges, so as not to trample his young crops, he rode up to the laborers who had been sent to sow clover.  A cart with the seed in it was standing, not at the edge, but in the middle of the crop, and the winter corn had been torn up by the wheels and trampled by the horse.  Both the laborers were sitting in the hedge, probably smoking a pipe together.  The earth in the cart, with which the seed was mixed, was not crushed to powder, but crusted together or adhering in clods.  Seeing the master, the laborer, Vassily, went towards the cart, while Mishka set to work sowing.  This was not as it should be, but with the laborers Levin seldom lost his temper.  When Vassily came up, Levin told him to lead the horse to the hedge.

“It’s all right, sir, it’ll spring up again,” responded Vassily.

“Please don’t argue,” said Levin, “but do as you’re told.”

“Yes, sir,” answered Vassily, and he took the horse’s head.  “What a sowing, Konstantin Dmitrievitch,” he said, hesitating; “first rate.  Only it’s a work to get about!  You drag a ton of earth on your shoes.”

“Why is it you have earth that’s not sifted?” said Levin.

“Well, we crumble it up,” answered Vassily, taking up some seed and rolling the earth in his palms.

Vassily was not to blame for their having filled up his cart with unsifted earth, but still it was annoying.

Levin had more than once already tried a way he knew for stifling his anger, and turning all that seemed dark right again, and he tried that way now.  He watched how Mishka strode along, swinging the huge clods of earth that clung to each foot; and getting off his horse, he took the sieve from Vassily and started sowing himself.

“Where did you stop?”

Vassily pointed to the mark with his foot, and Levin went forward as best he could, scattering the seed on the land.  Walking was as difficult as on a bog, and by the time Levin had ended the row he was in a great heat, and he stopped and gave up the sieve to Vassily.

“Well, master, when summer’s here, mind you don’t scold me for these rows,” said Vassily.

“Eh?” said Levin cheerily, already feeling the effect of his method.

“Why, you’ll see in the summer time.  It’ll look different.  Look you where I sowed last spring.  How I did work at it!  I do my best, Konstantin Dmitrievitch, d’ye see, as I would for my own father.  I don’t like bad work myself, nor would I let another man do it.  What’s good for the master’s good for us too.  To look out yonder now,” said Vassily, pointing, “it does one’s heart good.”

“It’s a lovely spring, Vassily.”

“Why, it’s a spring such as the old men don’t remember the like of.  I was up home; an old man up there has sown wheat too, about an acre of it.  He was saying you wouldn’t know it from rye.”

“Have you been sowing wheat long?”

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