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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.
Levin gazed admiringly at the cows he knew so intimately to the minutest detail of their condition, and gave orders for them to be driven out into the meadow, and the calves to be let into the paddock.  The herdsman ran gaily to get ready for the meadow.  The cowherd girls, picking up their petticoats, ran splashing through the mud with bare legs, still white, not yet brown from the sun, waving brush wood in their hands, chasing the calves that frolicked in the mirth of spring.

After admiring the young ones of that year, who were particularly fine—­the early calves were the size of a peasant’s cow, and Pava’s daughter, at three months old, was as big as a yearling—­ Levin gave orders for a trough to be brought out and for them to be fed in the paddock.  But it appeared that as the paddock had not been used during the winter, the hurdles made in the autumn for it were broken.  He sent for the carpenter, who, according to his orders, ought to have been at work at the thrashing machine.  But it appeared that the carpenter was repairing the harrows, which ought to have been repaired before Lent.  This was very annoying to Levin.  It was annoying to come upon that everlasting slovenliness in the farm work against which he had been striving with all his might for so many years.  The hurdles, as he ascertained, being not wanted in winter, had been carried to the cart-horses’ stable; and there broken, as they were of light construction, only meant for feeding calves.  Moreover, it was apparent also that the harrows and all the agricultural implements, which he had directed to be looked over and repaired in the winter, for which very purpose he had hired three carpenters, had not been put into repair, and the harrows were being repaired when they ought to have been harrowing the field.  Levin sent for his bailiff, but immediately went off himself to look for him.  The bailiff, beaming all over, like everyone that day, in a sheepskin bordered with astrachan, came out of the barn, twisting a bit of straw in his hands.

“Why isn’t the carpenter at the thrashing machine?”

“Oh, I meant to tell you yesterday, the harrows want repairing.  Here it’s time they got to work in the fields.”

“But what were they doing in the winter, then?”

“But what did you want the carpenter for?”

“Where are the hurdles for the calves’ paddock?”

“I ordered them to be got ready.  What would you have with those peasants!” said the bailiff, with a wave of his hand.

“It’s not those peasants but this bailiff!” said Levin, getting angry.  “Why, what do I keep you for?” he cried.  But, bethinking himself that this would not help matters, he stopped short in the middle of a sentence, and merely sighed.  “Well, what do you say?  Can sowing begin?” he asked, after a pause.

“Behind Turkin tomorrow or the next day they might begin.”

“And the clover?”

“I’ve sent Vassily and Mishka; they’re sowing.  Only I don’t know if they’ll manage to get through; it’s so slushy.”

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