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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,033 pages of information about Anna Karenina.

On reaching home Alexey Alexandrovitch went to his study, as he usually did, seated himself in his low chair, opened a book on the Papacy at the place where he had laid the paper-knife in it, and read till one o’clock, just as he usually did.  But from time to time he rubbed his high forehead and shook his head, as though to drive away something.  At his usual time he got up and made his toilet for the night.  Anna Arkadyevna had not yet come in.  With a book under his arm he went upstairs.  But this evening, instead of his usual thoughts and meditations upon official details, his thoughts were absorbed by his wife and something disagreeable connected with her.  Contrary to his usual habit, he did not get into bed, but fell to walking up and down the rooms with his hands clasped behind his back.  He could not go to bed, feeling that it was absolutely needful for him first to think thoroughly over the position that had just arisen.

When Alexey Alexandrovitch had made up his mind that he must talk to his wife about it, it had seemed a very easy and simple matter.  But now, when he began to think over the question that had just presented itself, it seemed to him very complicated and difficult.

Alexey Alexandrovitch was not jealous.  Jealousy according to his notions was an insult to one’s wife, and one ought to have confidence in one’s wife.  Why one ought to have confidence—­ that is to say, complete conviction that his young wife would always love him—­he did not ask himself.  But he had no experience of lack of confidence, because he had confidence in her, and told himself that he ought to have it.  Now, though his conviction that jealousy was a shameful feeling and that one ought to feel confidence, had not broken down, he felt that he was standing face to face with something illogical and irrational, and did not know what was to be done.  Alexey Alexandrovitch was standing face to face with life, with the possibility of his wife’s loving someone other than himself, and this seemed to him very irrational and incomprehensible because it was life itself.  All his life Alexey Alexandrovitch had lived and worked in official spheres, having to do with the reflection of life.  And every time he had stumbled against life itself he had shrunk away from it.  Now he experienced a feeling akin to that of a man who, while calmly crossing a precipice by a bridge, should suddenly discover that the bridge is broken, and that there is a chasm below.  That chasm was life itself, the bridge that artificial life in which Alexey Alexandrovitch had lived.  For the first time the question presented itself to him of the possibility of his wife’s loving someone else, and he was horrified at it.

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