Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 308 pages of information about Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science.

ILLUSTRATIONS

  Fountain of the Catholic total abstinence union.

  Judges’ pavilion.

  Women’s pavilion.

  United states government building.

  Ohio building.

  New Jersey building.

  New York building.

  Pennsylvania building.

  Plan of exhibition grounds.

  Japanese building.

  Swedish school-house.

  Spanish building.

  British buildings.

  German building.

  Horticultural hall—­interior.

  AMMALE.

  Turkish lady.

  The sultan’s new palace on the bosphorus.

  Marble Staircase, palace of BESKIK-Tasch.

  Mosque of st. Sophia.

  Interior of the mosque of st. Sophia.

  Harem scene.

  Mount pleasant.

LIPPINCOTT’S MAGAZINE

OF

POPULAR LITERATURE AND SCIENCE.

May, 1876.

THE CENTURY—­ITS FRUITS AND ITS FESTIVAL.

V.—­Minor structures of the exhibition.

[Illustration:  Fountain of the Catholic total abstinence union.]

Compress it as you may, this globe of ours remains quite a bulky affair.  The world in little is not reducible to a microscopic point.  The nations collected to show their riches, crude and wrought, bring with them also their wants.  For the display, for its comfort and good order, not only space, but a carefully-planned organization and a multiplicity of appliances are needed.  Separate or assembled, men demand a home, a government, workshops, show-rooms and restaurants.  For even so paternal and, within its especial domain, autocratic a sway as that of the Centennial Commission to provide all these directly would be impossible.  A great deal is, as in the outer world, necessarily left to private effort, combined or individual.

Having in our last paper sketched the provision made by the management for sheltering and properly presenting to the eye the objects on exhibition, we shall now turn from the strictly public buildings to the more numerous ones which surround them, and descend, so to speak, from the Capitol to the capital.

Our circuit brought us back to the neighborhood of the principal entrance.  Standing here, facing the interval between the Main Building and Machinery Hall, our eyes and steps are conducted from great to greater by a group of buildings which must bear their true name of offices, belittling as a title suggestive of clerks and counting-rooms is to dimensions and capacity exceeding those of most churches.  Right and left a brace of these modest but sightly and habitable-looking

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Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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