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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 194 pages of information about The Old Franciscan Missions Of California.
careless and improvident; so, when Pico wrote him to give up the Mission lands and property to the renters, he did so willingly, though he stated that the estate owed him $1000 for money he had advanced for the use of the Indians.  The Indians were to receive one third of the rental, but there is no record of a cent of it ever getting into their hands.  June 10, 1846, Pico sold the Mission to Richard S. Den for $7500, though the lessees seem to have kept possession until about the end of 1848.  The land commission confirmed Den’s title, though the evidences are that it was annulled in later litigation.  Padre Duran died here early in 1846, a month after Bishop Diego.  Padre Gonzalez Rubio still remained for almost thirty years longer to become the last of the old missionaries.

In 1853 a petition was presented to Rome, and Santa Barbara was erected into a Hospice, as the beginning of an Apostolic College for the education of Franciscan novitiates who are to go forth, wherever sent, as missionaries.  St. Anthony’s College, the modern building near by, was founded by the energy of Father Peter Wallischeck.  It is for the education of aspirants to the Franciscan Order.  There are now thirty-five students.

[Illustration:  DOOR TO CEMETERY, SANTA BARBARA.]

[Illustration:  MISSION BELL AT SANTA BARBARA.]

[Illustration:  THE SACRISTY WALL, GARDEN AND TOWERS, MISSION SANTA BARBARA.]

[Illustration:  FACHADA OF MISSION LA PURISIMA CONCEPCION, NEAR LOMPOC, CALIF]

Five of the early missionaries and three of later date are buried in the crypt, under the floor of the sanctuary, in front of the high altar; and Bishop Diego rests under the floor at the right-hand side of the altar.

The small cemetery, which is walled in and entered from the church, is said to contain the bodies of 4000 Indians, as well as a number of whites.  In the northeast corner is the vault in which are buried the members of the Franciscan community.

In the bell tower are two old bells made in 1818, as is evidenced by their inscriptions, which read alike, as follows:  “Manvel Vargas me fecit ano d. 1818 Mision de Santa Barbara De la nveba California”—­“Manuel Vargas made me Anno Domini 1818.  Mission of Santa Barbara of New California.”  The first bell is fastened to its beam with rawhide thongs; the second, with a framework of iron.  Higher up is a modern bell which is rung (the old ones being tolled only).

The Mission buildings surround the garden, into which no woman, save a reigning queen or the wife of the President of the United States, is allowed to enter.  An exception was made in the case of the Princess Louise when her husband was the Governor-general of Canada.  The wife of President Harrison also has entered.  The garden, with its fine Italian cypress, planted by Bishop Diego about 1842, and its hundred varieties of semi-tropical flowers, in the center of which is a fountain where goldfish play, affords a delightful place of study, quiet, and meditation for the Franciscans.

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