The Old Franciscan Missions Of California eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 194 pages of information about The Old Franciscan Missions Of California.

[Illustration:  TOWER, FLYING BUTTRESSES, ETC., GLENWOOD MISSION INN, RIVERSIDE.]

[Illustration:  ARCHES OVER THE SIDEWALK, GLENWOOD MISSION INN, RIVERSIDE, CALIF.]

[Illustration:  RESIDENCE OF FRED MAIER, LOS ANGELES, CALIF.]

[Illustration:  WASHINGTON SCHOOL, VISALIA, CALIF.]

Beyond is the Refectorio, or dining-room of an ancient Mission, containing a collection of kitchen and dining utensils, some of them from Moorish times.  It has a stone ceiling, groined arches, and harvest festival windows, which also represent varied characters, scenes, industries and recreations connected with old Mission life.

Three other special features of the Mission Inn are its wonderful collection of crosses, of bells, and the Ford paintings.  Any one of these would grace the halls of a national collection of rare and valuable antiques.  Of the crosses it can truthfully be said that they form the largest and most varied collection in the world, and the bells have been the subject of several articles in leading magazines.

The Ford paintings are a complete representation of all the Missions and were made by Henry Chapman Ford, of Santa Barbara, mainly during the years 1880-1881, though some of them are dated as early as 1875.

The Glenwood Mission Inn proved so popular that in the summer and fall of 1913 two new wings were added, surrounding a Spanish Court.  This Court has cloisters on two sides and cloistered galleries above, and is covered with Spanish tile, as it is used for an open air dining-room.  One of the new wings, a room 100 feet long by 30 feet wide, and three stories high, with coffered ceiling, is a Spanish Art Gallery.  Here are displayed old Spanish pictures and tapestries, many of which were collected by Mr. Miller personally on his European and Mexican trips.

At the same time the dining-room was enlarged by more than half its former capacity, one side of it looking out through large French windows on the cloisters and the court itself.  This necessitated the enlargement of the kitchen which is now thrown open to the observation of the guests whenever desired.

Taking it all in all, the Glenwood Mission Inn is not only a unique and delightful hostelry, but a wonderful manifestation of the power of the Franciscan friars to impress their spirit and life upon the commercial age of a later and more material civilization.

CHAPTER XXXV

THE INTERIOR DECORATIONS OF THE MISSIONS

We cannot to-day determine how the Franciscans of the Southwest decorated the interiors of all their churches.  Some of these buildings have disappeared entirely, while others have been restored or renovated beyond all semblance of their original condition.  But enough are left to give us a satisfactory idea of the labors of the fathers and of their subject Indians.  At the outset, it must be confessed that

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The Old Franciscan Missions Of California from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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