Great Britain and the American Civil War eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 680 pages of information about Great Britain and the American Civil War.

[Footnote 302:  Lyons Papers.]

[Footnote 303:  F.O., Am., Vol 756.  No. 227.  On this same day Russell was writing privately to Edward Everett, in Boston, a clear statement of the British position, defending the Proclamation of Neutrality and adding, “It is not our practice to treat five millions of freemen as pirates, and to hang their sailors if they stop our merchantmen.  But unless we mean to treat them as pirates and to hang them, we could not deny them belligerent rights.”  C.F.  Adams, “Seward and the Declaration of Paris,” pp. 49-50.]

[Footnote 304:  F.O., France, Vol. 1377.  No. 176.  Draft.  Russell to Cowley, July 15, 1861.]

[Footnote 305:  F.O., France, Vol. 1394.  No. 871.]

[Footnote 306:  Russell Papers.  Also in a despatch of July 16 Cowley repeated his objections and stated that Dayton had not yet approached France. (F.O., France, Vol. 1394.  No. 871.)]

[Footnote 307:  F.O., Am., Vol. 755.  No. 168.  Enclosure.  Palmerston’s Note to Russell was not sent to Adams but his exact language is used in the last paragraph of the communication to Adams, November 18, as printed in Parliamentary Papers, 1862, Lords, Vol.  XXV.  “Correspondence respecting International Maritime Law.”  No. 19.]

[Footnote 308:  F.O., France, Vol. 1378.  No. 730.  Russell to Cowley, July 17, 1861.  Containing draft of telegram sent on 16th at 4.30 p.m.]

[Footnote 309:  Ibid., No. 729.]

[Footnote 310:  See ante pp. 142-45.]

[Footnote 311:  F.O., France, Vol. 1394.  No. 905.  Cowley to Russell, July 26, 1861.]

[Footnote 312:  It should be noted that during this period Russell learned that on July 5, Lyons, before receiving the recall of instructions, had finally begun through Consul Bunch at Charleston the overtures to the South.  On July 24, Russell approved this action (Parliamentary Papers, 1862, Lords, Vol.  XXV.  “Correspondence respecting International Maritime Law.”  No. 23.)]

[Footnote 313:  F.O., France, Vol. 1395.  No. 1031.  Cowley to Russell, August 20, 1861.]

[Footnote 314:  Palmerston MS., Russell to Palmerston, August 26, 1861.]

[Footnote 315:  See C.F.  Adams, “Seward and the Declaration of Paris,” pp. 58 and 74.]

[Footnote 316:  Adams, Life of C.F.  Adams, p. 209.]

[Footnote 317:  The Confederate Commissions on August 14, 1861, just before the critical moment in the Declaration of Paris negotiation, had made vigorous protest against this British order, characterizing it as giving a “favour” to the Government at Washington, and thus as lacking in neutrality.  Quoted by C.F.  Adams, “Seward and the Declaration of Paris,” p. 31.]

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