The Bay State Monthly — Volume 1, No. 6, June, 1884 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 122 pages of information about The Bay State Monthly Volume 1, No. 6, June, 1884.

It will thus be perceived that the portion of Beacon Hill, included between Beacon Street, Beaver Street, Cambridge Street, Bowdoin Square, Court Street, Tremont Row, and Tremont Street, containing about seventy-three acres, was sold, less than a century ago, at prices ranging from twenty-two to nine hundred dollars per acre, aggregating less than thirty thousand dollars.  It now comprises the ninth ward of the city of Boston, and contains within its limits a real estate valuation of sixteen millions of dollars.  Its name and fame are associated with important events and men prominent in American annals.  Upon its slopes have dwelt Josiah Quincy, of ante-Revolutionary fame, and his son and namesake of civic fame; and also his grandson and namesake, and Edmund, equally distinguished; Lemuel Shaw, Robert G. Shaw, Daniel Webster, Abbott Lawrence, Samuel, Nathan, and William Appleton, Samuel T. Armstrong, Mrs. Harrison Gray Otis, J. Lothrop Motley, William H. Prescott, Charles Sumner, John A. Andrew, John C. Warren, Mrs. Sarah J. Hale, Lyman Beecher, William E. Channing, and Hosea Ballou.  Lafayette made it his temporary home in 1824, and Kossuth in 1852.  During the present century, the laws of Massachusetts have been enacted upon and promulgated from its summit, and will probably continue so to be for ages to come.

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BRITISH FORCE AND THE LEADING LOSSES IN THE REVOLUTION.

[From Original Returns in the British Record Office.]

COMPILED BY HENRY B. CARRINGTON, U.S.A.

At Boston, in 1775, 9,147.

At New York, in 1776, 31,626.

In America:  June, 1777, 30,957; August, 1778, 33,756; February, 1779, 30,283; May, 1779, 33,458; December, 1779, 38,569; May, 1780, 38,002; August, 1780, 33,020; December, 1780, 33,766; May, 1781, 33,374; September, 1781, 42,075.

CASUALTIES.

Bunker Hill, 1,054; Long Island, 400; Fort Washington, 454; Trenton, 1,049 (including prisoners); Hubbardton, 360; Bennington, 207 (besides prisoners); Freeman’s Farm, 550; Bemis Heights, 500; Burgoyne’s Surrender, 5,763; Forts Clinton and Montgomery, 190; Brandywine, 600; Germantown, 535; Monmouth, 2,400 (including deserters); Siege of Charlestown, 265; Camden, 324; Cowpens, 729; Guilford Court House, 554; Hobkirk’s Hill, 258; Eutaw Springs, 693; New London, 163; Yorktown, 552; Cornwallis’s Surrender, 7,963.

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HISTORICAL NOTES.

BIRD AND SQUIRREL LEGISLATION IN 1776.

Whereas, much mischief happens from Crows, Black Birds, and Squirrels, by pulling up corn at this season of the year, therefore, be it enacted by this Town meeting, that ninepence as a bounty per head be given for every full-grown crow, and twopence half-penny per head for every young crow, and twopence half-penny per head for every crow blackbird, and one penny half-penny per head for every red-winged blackbird, and one penny half-penny per head for every thrush or jay bird and streaked squirrel that shall be killed, and presented to the Town Treasurer by the twentyeth day of June next, and that the same be paid out of the town treasury.”

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The Bay State Monthly — Volume 1, No. 6, June, 1884 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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