The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U. S. A., in the Rocky Mountains and the Far West eBook

Benjamin Bonneville
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 349 pages of information about The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U. S. A., in the Rocky Mountains and the Far West.

There was something in the whole appearance of the captain that prepossessed me in his favor.  He was of the middle size, well made and well set; and a military frock of foreign cut, that had seen service, gave him a look of compactness.  His countenance was frank, open, and engaging; well browned by the sun, and had something of a French expression.  He had a pleasant black eye, a high forehead, and, while he kept his hat on, the look of a man in the jocund prime of his days; but the moment his head was uncovered, a bald crown gained him credit for a few more years than he was really entitled to.

Being extremely curious, at the time, about every thing connected with the Far West, I addressed numerous questions to him.  They drew from him a number of extremely striking details, which were given with mingled modesty and frankness; and in a gentleness of manner, and a soft tone of voice, contrasting singularly with the wild and often startling nature of his themes.  It was difficult to conceive the mild, quiet-looking personage before you, the actual hero of the stirring scenes related.

In the course of three or four months, happening to be at the city of Washington, I again came upon the captain, who was attending the slow adjustment of his affairs with the War Department.  I found him quartered with a worthy brother in arms, a major in the army.  Here he was writing at a table, covered with maps and papers, in the centre of a large barrack room, fancifully decorated with Indian arms, and trophies, and war dresses, and the skins of various wild animals, and hung round with pictures of Indian games and ceremonies, and scenes of war and hunting.  In a word, the captain was beguiling the tediousness of attendance at court, by an attempt at authorship; and was rewriting and extending his travelling notes, and making maps of the regions he had explored.  As he sat at the table, in this curious apartment, with his high bald head of somewhat foreign cast, he reminded me of some of those antique pictures of authors that I have seen in old Spanish volumes.

The result of his labors was a mass of manuscript, which he subsequently put at my disposal, to fit it for publication and bring it before the world.  I found it full of interesting details of life among the mountains, and of the singular castes and races, both white men and red men, among whom he had sojourned.  It bore, too, throughout, the impress of his character, his bonhommie, his kindliness of spirit, and his susceptibility to the grand and beautiful.

That manuscript has formed the staple of the following work.  I have occasionally interwoven facts and details, gathered from various sources, especially from the conversations and journals of some of the captain’s contemporaries, who were actors in the scenes he describes.  I have also given it a tone and coloring drawn from my own observation, during an excursion into the Indian country beyond the bounds of civilization; as I before observed, however, the work is substantially the narrative of the worthy captain, and many of its most graphic passages are but little varied from his own language.

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The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, U. S. A., in the Rocky Mountains and the Far West from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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