Astoria, or, anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 479 pages of information about Astoria, or, anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains.

The aspect of this river and its vicinity was cheering to the wayworn and hungry travellers.  Its banks were green, and there were grassy valleys running from it various directions, into the heart of the rugged mountains, with herds of buffalo quietly grazing.  The hunters sallied forth with keen alacrity, and soon returned laden with provisions.

In this part of the mountains Mr. Hunt met with three different kinds of gooseberries.  The common purple, on a low and very thorny bush; a yellow kind, of an excellent flavor, growing on a stock free from thorns; and a deep purple, of the size and taste of our winter grape, with a thorny stalk.  There were also three kinds of currants, one very large and well tasted, of a purple color, and growing on a bush eight or nine feet high.  Another of a yellow color, and of the size and taste of the large red currant, the bush four or five feet high; and the third a beautiful scarlet, resembling the strawberry in sweetness, though rather insipid, and growing on a low bush.

On the 17th they continued down the course of the river, making fifteen miles to the southwest.  The river abounded with geese and ducks, and there were signs of its being inhabited by beaver and otters:  indeed they were now approaching regions where these animals, the great objects of the fur trade, are said to abound.  They encamped for the night opposite the end of a mountain in the west, which was probably the last chain of the Rocky Mountains.  On the following morning they abandoned the main course of the Spanish River, and taking a northwest direction for eight miles, came upon one of its little tributaries, issuing out of the bosom of the mountains, and running through green meadows, yielding pasturage to herds of buffalo.  As these were probably the last of that animal they would meet with, they encamped on the grassy banks of the river, determined to spend several days in hunting, so as to be able to jerk sufficient meat to supply them until they should reach the waters of the Columbia, where they trusted to find fish enough for their support.  A little repose, too, was necessary for both men and horses, after their rugged and incessant marching; having in the course of the last seventeen days traversed two hundred and sixty miles of rough, and in many parts sterile, mountain country.

CHAPTER XXX.

     A Plentiful Hunting Camp.-Shoshonie Hunters—­Hoback’s River
     —­Mad River—­Encampment Near the Pilot Knobs.—­A
     Consultation.—­Preparations for a Perilous Voyage.

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Astoria, or, anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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