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Émile Gaboriau
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about A Love Episode.

Helene, in compliance with the all-embracing sweep of the priest’s hand, cast a lingering look over illumined Paris.  Here too she knew not the names of those seeming stars.  She would have liked to ask what the blaze far below on the left betokened, for she saw it night after night.  There were others also which roused her curiosity, and some of them she loved, whilst some inspired her with uneasiness or vexation.

“Father,” said she, for the first time employing that appellation of affection and respect, “let me live as I am.  The loveliness of the night has agitated me.  You are wrong; you would not know how to console me, for you cannot understand my feelings.”

The priest stretched out his arms, then slowly dropped them to his side resignedly.  And after a pause he said in a whisper: 

“Doubtless that was bound to be the case.  You call for succor and reject salvation.  How many despairing confessions I have received!  What tears I have been unable to prevent!  Listen, my daughter, promise me one thing only; if ever life should become too heavy a burden for you, think that one honest man loves you and is waiting for you.  To regain content you will only have to place your hand in his.”

“I promise you,” answered Helene gravely.

As she made the avowal a ripple of laughter burst through the room.  Jeanne had just awoke, and her eyes were riveted on her doll pacing up and down the table.  Monsieur Rambaud, enthusiastic over the success of his tinkering, still kept his hands stretched out for fear lest any accident should happen.  But the doll retained its stability, strutted about on its tiny feet, and turned its head, whilst at every step repeating the same words after the fashion of a parrot.

“Oh! it’s some trick or other!” murmured Jeanne, who was still half asleep.  “What have you done to it—­tell me?  It was all smashed, and now it’s walking.  Give it me a moment; let me see.  Oh, you are a darling!”

Meanwhile over the gleaming expanse of Paris a rosy cloud was ascending higher and higher.  It might have been thought the fiery breath of a furnace.  At first it was shadowy-pale in the darkness—­a reflected glow scarcely seen.  Then slowly, as the evening progressed, it assumed a ruddier hue; and, hanging in the air, motionless above the city, deriving its being from all the lights and noisy life which breathed from below, it seemed like one of those clouds, charged with flame and lightning, which crown the craters of volcanoes.

CHAPTER XVI.

The finger-glasses had been handed round the table, and the ladies were daintily wiping their hands.  A momentary silence reigned, while Madame Deberle gazed on either side to see if every one had finished; then, without speaking, she rose, and amidst a noisy pushing back of chairs, her guests followed her example.  An old gentleman who had been seated at her right hand hastened to offer her his arm.

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