The Unknown Eros eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 69 pages of information about The Unknown Eros.
That rises from the plain. 
Know, ’twas the force of function high,
In corporate exercise, and public awe
Of Nature’s, Heaven’s, and England’s Law
That Best, though mix’d with Bad, should reign,
Which kept you in your sky! 
But, when the sordid Trader caught
The loose-held sceptre from your hands distraught,
And soon, to the Mechanic vain,
Sold the proud toy for nought,
Your charm was broke, your task was sped,
Your beauty, with your honour, dead,
And though you still are dreaming sweet
Of being even now not less
Than Gods and Goddesses, ye shall not long so cheat
Your hearts of their due heaviness. 
Go, get you for your evil watching shriven! 
Leave to your lawful Master’s itching hands
Your unking’d lands,
But keep, at least, the dignity
Of deigning not, for his smooth use, to be,
Voteless, the voted delegates
Of his strange interests, loves and hates. 
In sackcloth, or in private strife
With private ill, ye may please Heaven,
And soothe the coming pangs of sinking life;
And prayer perchance may win
A term to God’s indignant mood
And the orgies of the multitude,
Which now begin;
But do not hope to wave the silken rag
Of your unsanction’d flag,
And so to guide
The great ship, helmless on the swelling tide
Of that presumptuous Sea,
Unlit by sun or moon, yet inly bright
With lights innumerable that give no light,
Flames of corrupted will and scorn of right,
Rejoicing to be free. 
   And, now, because the dark comes on apace
When none can work for fear,
And Liberty in every Land lies slain,
And the two Tyrannies unchallenged reign,
And heavy prophecies, suspended long
At supplication of the righteous few,
And so discredited, to fulfilment throng,
Restrain’d no more by faithful prayer or tear,
And the dread baptism of blood seems near
That brings to the humbled Earth the Time of Grace,
Breathless be song,
And let Christ’s own look through
The darkness, suddenly increased,
To the gray secret lingering in the East.

XIV.  ‘IF I WERE DEAD.’

‘If I were dead, you’d sometimes say, Poor Child!’
The dear lips quiver’d as they spake,
And the tears brake
From eyes which, not to grieve me, brightly smiled. 
Poor Child, poor Child! 
I seem to hear your laugh, your talk, your song. 
It is not true that Love will do no wrong. 
Poor Child! 
And did you think, when you so cried and smiled,
How I, in lonely nights, should lie awake,
And of those words your full avengers make? 
Poor Child, poor Child! 
And now, unless it be
That sweet amends thrice told are come to thee,
O God, have Thou no mercy upon me! 
Poor Child!

XV.  PEACE.

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Project Gutenberg
The Unknown Eros from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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