The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 397 pages of information about The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899.

[Footnote 1:  No. 18.]

[Footnote 2:  No. 89.]

[Footnote 3:  No. 271.]

[Footnote 4:  Spectator, No. 532.]

[Footnote 5:  Tatler, No. 18.]

[Footnote 6:  No. 163.]

[Footnote 7:  No. 158.]

[Footnote 8:  Nos. 155, 160.]

[Footnote 9:  No. 249.]

[Footnote 10:  Nos. 100, 102.]

[Footnote 11:  No. 117.]

[Footnote 12:  No. 86.]

[Footnote 13:  No. 10.]

[Footnote 14:  No. 30.]

[Footnote 15:  No. 142.]

[Footnote 16:  No. 184.]

[Footnote 17:  No. 27.]

[Footnote 18:  No. 210.]

[Footnote 19:  No. 168.]

[Footnote 20:  Nos. 127, 186.]

[Footnote 21:  Nos. 25, 26, 29, 31, 38, 39.]

[Footnote 22:  Nos. 56, &c.]

[Footnote 23:  Nos. 40, 45.]

[Footnote 24:  No. 134.]

[Footnote 25:  See Nos. 115, 271.]

[Footnote 26:  No. 181.]

[Footnote 27:  No. 5.]

[Footnote 28:  No. 82.]

[Footnote 29:  No. 94.]

[Footnote 30:  No. 172.]

[Footnote 31:  Nos. 95, 114.]

[Footnote 32:  No. 49.]

[Footnote 33:  No. 33.]

[Footnote 34:  No. 149.]

[Footnote 35:  No. 85.  See, too, No. 104.]

[Footnote 36:  Nos. 141, 248.]

[Footnote 37:  No. 212.]

[Footnote 38:  Nos, 40, 42, 47.]

[Footnote 39:  No. 68.]

[Footnote 40:  No. 8.]

[Footnote 41:  No. 6.]

[Footnote 42:  No. 87.]

THE TATLER

THE PREFACE.[43]

In the last Tatler I promised some explanation of passages and persons mentioned in this work, as well as some account of the assistances I have had in the performance.  I shall do this in very few words; for when a man has no design but to speak plain truth, he may say a great deal in a very narrow compass.  I have in the dedication of the first volume made my acknowledgments to Dr. Swift, whose pleasant writings, in the name of Bickerstaff, created an inclination in the town towards anything that could appear in the same disguise.  I must acknowledge also, that at my first entering upon this work, a certain uncommon way of thinking, and a turn in conversation peculiar to that agreeable gentleman, rendered his company very advantageous to one whose imagination was to be continually employed upon obvious and common subjects, though at the same time obliged to treat of them in a new and unbeaten method.  His verses on the Shower in Town,[44] and the Description of the Morning,[45] are instances of the happiness of that genius, which could raise such pleasing ideas upon occasions so barren to an ordinary invention.

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