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Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 801 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels.

641.  Voyage a la Cote Meridionale d’Afrique, 1786-7.  Par L. de Grandpie.  Paris, 1802. 2 vols. 8vo.—­Much information on the Slave Trade, and a plan for abolishing it, by introducing civilization and a love of commerce into this part of Africa, occupy the greater part of the first volume; the second volume, which comprises the Cape of Good Hope, gives details which will be found useful to those who navigate and trade in these parts.  The manners, &c. of the people are by no means overlooked.

INTERIOR OF AFRICA.

642.  Travels in the inland parts of Africa, to which is added, Captain Stubbs’s Voyage up the Gambia, in 1723.  By Francis Moore, 1758. 4to.—­1742. 8vo.—­This is a valuable work, and introduces the reader to many parts and tribes of Africa, which even yet are little known, partly drawn from the accounts of an African prince who came to England.  Of this information, and that collected by Captain Stubbs, Moore, who was superintendant of the African Company’s establishments in the Gambia, availed himself in drawing up this work.

Little additional information respecting the interior of Africa was obtained, till the establishment of the African Association in 1788.  It is unnecessary to give an individual and particular character of the works which were drawn up under their auspices; the persons they employed, were, in many respects, in general admirably calculated for the ardous enterprize, and certainly by their labours have added not a little to our knowledge of the geography, manners, trade, &c. of this part of Africa.  But it is to be regretted, that they were not qualified to investigate the natural history of the countries they visited, especially as these must be extremely rich in all the departments of this branch of science.  To these preliminary observations and general character, we add the titles of the principal travels undertaken under the auspices of the African Association.

643.  African Association, their Proceedings for prosecuting the discovery of the interior parts of Africa, containing the Journals of Ledyard, Lucas, Houghton, Horneman, Nicholls, &c. 1810. 2 vols. 8vo.

644.  Park’s Travels in the interior districts of Africa, 1795-97, with geographical illustrations, by Major Rennell, 1799. 4to.

645.  The Journal of a Mission to the interior of Africa, in 1805.  By Park, 1815. 4to.

In 1803, there was published at Paris, a French translation of Horneman’s Travels, with notes, and a memoir on the Oases, by Langles.  Those notes and memoirs were principally drawn from Arabian authors; and, together with the rectification of the names of places, render the translation valuable.

646.  Jackson’s account of Tombuctoo and Housa, with Travels through West and South Barbary, and across the Mountains of Atlas, 8vo. 1820.—­So long as it is so extremely dangerous and difficult

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