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Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 801 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels.

291.  Traite sur le Commerce de la Mer Noire.  Par M. de Peysonnel.  Paris, 1783. 2 vols. 8vo.—­Besides the commerce of the Crimea, its soil, agriculture, and productions, and its political state before it was annexed to Russia, are treated of in these volumes.

292.  Description Physique de la Tauride.  La Haye. 8vo.—­This work, translated from the Russian, is intended to complete the survey of the Russian empire:  it relates chiefly to natural history in all its three branches.

293.  Voyage en Crimea, 1803.  Par J. Reuilly.  Paris, 1806. 8vo.—­The author was assisted by the celebrated Pallas, who, at this time, lived in the Crimea.  The physical as well as political state of this country are comprised in this work.

294.  Les Ruins des plus beaux Monumens de la Grece, consideres du cote de l’Histoire et du cote de l’Architecture.  Par M. Le Roi.  Paris, 1770. fol.

295.  Voyage Litteraire de la Grece, ou Lettres sur les Grecs Anciens et Modernes, avec un parallele de leurs Moeurs.  Par M. Guys.  Paris, 1783. 4 vols. 8vo.

  The peculiar nature of these two works is sufficiently indicated by
  their respective title:  they are both interesting.

296.  Voyage en Grece et en Turquie.  Par Sonnini.  Paris, 1801. 4to.—­This work, which is translated into English, is rich in natural history, commerce, and manners, particularly regarding some of the islands of the Archipelago, Rhodes, Macedonia, the Morea, and Asia Minor.

297.  Voyage en Morea, a Constantinople, en Albania, &c. 1799—­1801.  Par Pouqueville.

298.  Voyage dans la Grece.  Par Pouqueville. vol. 1. 4to.  Paris, 1820.—­The first work has been translated into English:  they are both full of information, especially respecting Albania, though more accurate investigations, or perhaps different views and opinions, have induced subsequent travellers to differ from him in some respects.

299.  Bartholdy, Voyage en Grece, 1803-4. 2 vols. 8vo.  Paris, 1807.

300.  Moeurs, Usages, Costumes des Ottomans.  Par Castellan.  Paris, 1812. 6 vols.12mo.—­The value of this work is enhanced by the illustrations supplied by Langles from oriental authors.

301.  Lettres sur la Grece.  Par Castellan.  Paris, 1810. 8vo.—­The Hellespont and Constantinople are the principal subjects of these letters, which are lively and amusing in their pictures of manners and life.  The same character applies to his “Lettres sur l’Italie.”  Paris, 1819. 3 vols. 8vo.

302.  Voyage a l’Embouchure de la Mer Noire.  Par Andreossy.  Paris, 1818. 8vo.—­A valuable work on physical geography, and to the engineer and architect, and such as might have been expected from the professional pursuits and favourable opportunities of the author.

303.  Lettres sur le Bosphore, 1816—­19. 8vo. 1821.

304.  Voyage Pittoresque et Historique de l’Istrie et de la Dalmatie, redige d’apres l’Itineraire de L.F.  Cassas, peintre.  Par J. Lavallee.  Paris, 1802. fol.—­This splendid work, as its title indicates, principally relates to antiquities:  there are, however, interspersed notices on manners, commerce, &c.  Zara, celebrated for its marasquin, is particularly described.

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