Forgot your password?  

A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels - Volume 18 eBook

Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 801 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels.
course, are interesting in all; and to those whose studies and enquiries lead them to investigate the differences in the different families of the human race, the opportunities afforded them by the Gothic Nations of Scandinavia; the Slavonic nations of Russia and Poland; and the totally distinct and singular races which inhabit Lapland and Finland, must be valuable and useful.
When we enter Turkey, the scene changes, or rather expands.  Within its European, as well as its Asiatic empire, travellers of all descriptions, however various their objects, will find rich and ample materials.  Situated in a mild climate, with great variety of soil, in it are found plants remarkable for their uses in medicine and the arts, or for their beauty:  its mountainous districts contain treasures for the mineralogist; and to the politician and student of human nature, it exhibits the decided effects of the Mahometan religion, and of Asiatic despotism.  But what principally distinguishes it from the other countries which have hitherto occupied us, must be sought in its ruins of Grecian magnificence and taste:  in the traces and evidences it affords of ancient times, manners, and acquirements:  in the hold it possesses over our feelings, and even over our judgment, as being classic ground—­the soil which nourished the heroes of Marathon and the bard of Troy.—­The language, the manners, the customs, the human form and countenance of ancient Greece, are forcibly recalled to our recollection.
The travels in this part of the world have been so numerous, that we must be strict and limited in our selection, having regard principally to those which exhibit it under its various aspects with the greatest fidelity, at various periods.

268.  Nicholai Clenard Epistola de Rebus Mahomediis, in Itinere scriptis.  Louvain, 1551. 8vo.

269.  Petrus Gyllius de Bosphoro Thracio.  Elzerer, 1561. 4to.—­This is one of the first travellers who describes the antiquities of this part of Turkey:  manners and natural history, such as it was in his time, also come under his notice.  Dallaway praises him.

270.  Sandy’s (Geo.) Travels, containing the State of the Turkish Empire, of Greece, Egypt, and the Holy Land. 1673. fol.—­Sandys was an accomplished gentleman, well prepared by previous study for his Travels, which are distinguished by erudition, sagacity, and a love of truth, and are written in a pleasant style.

271.  Ricault’s History of the Present State of the Ottoman Empire. 1689. 8vo.—­Ricault was secretary to the English Embassy at the Porte in 1661.  The Mahometan religion, the seraglio, the maritime and land forces of Turkey are particularly noticed by him.  An excellent translation into French, with most valuable notes, by Bespier, was published at Rouen, in 1677. 2 vols. 12mo.

272.  Lady Mary Wortley Montague’s Letters.—­A great number of editions of these Letters have been published.  In 1805, her Works were published in 5 vols. 12mo., containing Letters which had not previously appeared.  The character of her work, which principally relates to Turkey, is well known.

Follow Us on Facebook