The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 474 pages of information about The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai.
broken into treacherous hollows, too porous to retain water and preserving a characteristic vegetation.  About this region has gathered the mysterious lore of the spirit world.  “Fear to do evil in the uplands of Puna,” warns the old chant, lest mischief befall from the countless wood spirits who haunt these mysterious forests.  Pele, the volcano goddess, still loves her old haunts in Puna, and many a modern native boasts a meeting with this beauty of the flaming red hair who swept to his fate the brave youth from Kauai when he raced with her down the slope to the sea during the old mythic days when the rocks and hills of Puna were forming.

Footnotes to Background of the Story

[Footnote 1:  Kuakoa, iv, No. 31, translated also in Hawaiian Annual, 1912, p. 101; Daggett, p. 70; Fornander, II, 272.]

[Illustration:  MAUNA KEA IN ITS MANTLE OF SNOW (HENSHAW)]

LAIE I KA WAI

A HAWAIIAN ROMANCE TRANSLATED FROM THE HAWAIIAN TEXT OF S.N.  HALEOLE (PRINTED IN HONOLULU, 1863)[1]

[Footnote 1:  Title pages.

(First edition.) The story of Laie-i-ka-wai, The Beauty of Pali-uli, the Woman-of-the-Twilight.  Composed from the old stories of Hawaii.  Written by S.N.  Haleole, Honolulu, Oahu.  Published by Henry W. Whitney, editor of the Kuakoa, 1863.

(Second edition.) The Treasure-Book of Hawaii.  The Story of Laie-i-ka-wai who is called The-Woman-of-the-Twilight.  Revised and published by Solomon Meheula and Henry Bolster.  For the benefit and progress of the new generation of the Hawaiian race.  Honolulu.  Printed by the Bulletin, 1888.]

FOREWORD

The editor of this book rejoices to print the first fruits of his efforts to enrich the Hawaiian people with a story book.  We have previously had books of instruction on many subjects and also those enlightening us as to the right and the wrong; but this is the first book printed for us Hawaiians in story form, depicting the ancient customs of this people, for fear lest otherwise we lose some of their favorite traditions.  Thus we couch in a fascinating manner the words and deeds of a certain daughter of Hawaii, beautiful and greatly beloved, that by this means there may abide in the Hawaiian people the love of their ancestors and their country.

Take it, then, this little book, for what it is worth, to read and to prize, thus showing your search after the knowledge of things Hawaiian, being ever ready to uphold them that they be not lost.

Copyrights
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The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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