The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 474 pages of information about The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai.

[Footnote 75:  The divine approach marked by thunder and lightning, shaken by earthquake and storm, indicates the kupua bodies in which the Sun god travels in his descent to earth.  There are many parallels to be found in the folk stories.  When the sister of Halemano sets out to woo the beauty of Puna she says:  “When the lightning flashes, I am at Maui; when it thunders I am at Kohala; when the earth quakes, at Hamakua; when freshets stain the streams red, I am at Puna.”  When Hoamakeikekula, the beauty of Kohala, weds, “thunder was heard, lightning flashed, rain came down in torrents, hills were covered with fog; for ten days mist covered the earth.”  When Uweuwelekehau, son of Ku and Hula, is born “thunder, lightning, earthquake, water, floods and rain” attend his birth.  In Aukelenuiaiku, when the wife of Makalii comes out of her house her beauty overshadows the rays of the sun, “darkness covered the land, the red rain, fog, and fine rain followed each other, then freshets flowed and lightning played in the heavens; after this the form of the woman, was seen coming along over the tips of the fingers of her servants, in all her beauty, the sun shone at her back and the rainbow was as though it were her footstool.”  In the prayer to the god Lono, quoted by Fornander, II, 352, we read: 

  “These are the sacred signs of the assembly;
   Bursting forth is the voice of the thunder;
   Striking are the rays of the lightning;
   Shaking the earth is the earthquake;
   Coming is the dark cloud and the rainbow;
   Wildly comes the rain and the wind;
   Whirlwinds sweep over the earth;
   Rolling down are the rocks of the ravines;
   The red mountain streams are rushing to the sea;
   Here the waterspouts;
   Tumbled about are the clustering clouds of heaven;
   Gushing forth are the springs of the mountains.”]

CHAPTER XXXIV

[Footnote 75:  Kaonohiokala, Mr. Emerson tells me, is the name of one of the evil spirits invoked by the priest in the art of po’iuhane or “soul-catching.”  The spirit is sent by the priest to entice the soul of an enemy while its owner sleeps, in order that he may catch it in a coconut gourd and crush it to death between his hands. “Lapu lapuwale” is the Hawaiian rendering of Solomon’s ejaculation “Vanity of vanities!”]

[Illustration:  A NATIVE GRASS HOUSE OF THE HUMBLER CLASS (HENSHAW)]

APPENDIX

HAWAIIAN STORIES

ABSTRACTS FROM THE TALES COLLECTED BY

FORNANDER AND EDITED BY THOMAS G. THRUM.

THE BISHOP MUSEUM, HONOLULU

HAWAIIAN STORIES

I. SONG of CREATION, as translated by Liliuokalani

II.  CHANTS RELATING THE ORIGIN OF THE GROUP: 
From the Fornander manuscript: 

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The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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