Keeping Fit All the Way eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 88 pages of information about Keeping Fit All the Way.

In the “Grind” exercises special precaution should be taken not to let the center of the circle, that the hands are making, come in front of the shoulders; it should be straight out in the horizontal position; moreover, as the arm goes backward an attempt should be made to make the shoulder-blades almost meet.  This is particularly necessary on the reverse—­that is, when the hands are coming forward—­for here the tendency, unless men keep the shoulders back, is to contract the chest.

Grate:  (The order is “Shoulder Grate.  Ready—­Cross.  Grate!”) Assume the “Cross” position.  Then at a count of “One” the arms are slowly raised, as a deep inhalation is taken, to an angle of forty-five degrees from horizontal; at the same time the heels are raised till the weight of the body rests on the balls of the feet. (See Fig. 5.)

[Illustration:  Fig. 5.—­Grate

The caution in the “Grate” position is not to let the arms drop, even a fraction of an inch, below the horizontal, and not to let them go up above the angle of forty-five degrees, for in either of these cases there is a distinct rest given to the shoulder muscles.  Most of the ordinary exercises of this kind carry the arms above the head; this always releases the effort of the shoulder muscle and is therefore nearly valueless as an exercise for these members.

Another fault in this exercise is letting the head come forward.  The neck should be kept back all the time.]

At “Two” the arms are slowly returned to “Cross” as all air is exhaled and the heels are lowered to a normal position.  Care should be taken to see that the arms are not allowed to drop below the level of the shoulders or to rise more than forty-five degrees.  The arms should be raised and lowered ten times.

The caution in the “Grate” position is not to let the arms drop, even a fraction of an inch, below the horizontal, and not to let them go up above the angle of forty-five degrees, for in either of these cases there is a distinct rest given to the shoulder muscles.  Most of the ordinary exercises of this kind carry the arms above the head; this always releases the effort of the shoulder muscle and is therefore nearly valueless as an exercise for these members.

Another fault in this exercise is letting the head come forward.  The neck should be kept back all the time.

[Illustration:  Fig. 5 A.—­Second position of Grate]

Grasp:  (The order is “Head Grasp.  Ready—­Cross.  Grasp!”) Assume the “Cross” position.  Then place the hands behind the head.  With head up and eyes front, and in time with the counting, “One, two, three, four,” the body is bent forward from the waist as far as possible. (See Fig. 6.)

[Illustration:  Fig. 6.—­Grasp

In the “Grasp” position it is not necessary to go to extremes on the backward movement; only so far as is really comfortable.  In the forward movement the body should come down practically at right angles to the hips, but the head should not be allowed to drop forward.  The head should be kept up, with the elbows back and the eyes looking to the front.]

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Keeping Fit All the Way from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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