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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 194 pages of information about Cambridge Essays on Education.

V. CITIZENSHIP

By Albert Mansbridge, M.A., Joint-Secretary of the Cambridge University Tutorial Classes Committee; Founder and formerly Secretary of the Workers’ Educational Association

VI.  THE PLACE OF LITERATURE IN EDUCATION

      By Nowell Smith, M.A., Head Master of
      Sherborne School; formerly Fellow of Magdalen
      College, Oxford, Fellow and Tutor of New College,
      Oxford, Assistant Master at Winchester College

VII.  THE PLACE OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

      By William Bateson, F.R.S., Director of the
      John Innes Horticultural Institution, Honorary
      Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge; formerly
      Professor of Biology in the University of Cambridge

VIII.  ATHLETICS

By Frederic BLAGDEN MALIM, M.A., Master of Haileybury College; formerly Assistant Master at Marlborough College, Head Master of Sedbergh School

IX.  THE USE OF LEISURE

      By John Haden Badley, M.A., Head Master of
      Bedales School

X. PREPARATION FOR PRACTICAL LIFE

      By Sir John David MCCLURE, LL.D., D.MUS.,
      Head Master of Mill Hill School

XI.  TEACHING AS A PROFESSION

      By Frank Roscoe, Secretary of the Teachers
      Registration Council

INTRODUCTION

In times of anxiety and discontent, when discontent has engendered the belief that great and widespread economic and social changes are needed, there is a risk that men or States may act hastily, rushing to new schemes which seem promising chiefly because they are new, catching at expedients that have a superficial air of practicality, and forgetting the general theory upon which practical plans should be based.  At such moments there is special need for the restatement and enforcement by argument of sound principles.  To such principles so far as they relate to education it is the aim of these essays to recall the public mind.  They cover so many branches of educational theory and deal with them so fully and clearly, being the work of skilled and vigorous thinkers, that it would be idle for me to enter in a short introduction upon those topics which they have discussed with special knowledge far greater than I possess.  All I shall attempt is to present a few scattered observations on the general problems of education as they stand to-day.

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