Tales of a Traveller eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 341 pages of information about Tales of a Traveller.

THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER.

A few miles from Boston, in Massachusetts, there is a deep inlet winding several miles into the interior of the country from Charles Bay, and terminating in a thickly-wooded swamp, or morass.  On one side of this inlet is a beautiful dark grove; on the opposite side the land rises abruptly from the water’s edge, into a high ridge on which grow a few scattered oaks of great age and immense size.  It was under one of these gigantic trees, according to old stories, that Kidd the pirate buried his treasure.  The inlet allowed a facility to bring the money in a boat secretly and at night to the very foot of the hill.  The elevation of the place permitted a good look-out to be kept that no one was at hand, while the remarkable trees formed good landmarks by which the place might easily be found again.  The old stories add, moreover, that the devil presided at the hiding of the money, and took it under his guardianship; but this, it is well-known, he always does with buried treasure, particularly when it has been ill gotten.  Be that as it may, Kidd never returned to recover his wealth; being shortly after seized at Boston, sent out to England, and there hanged for a pirate.

About the year 1727, just at the time when earthquakes were prevalent in New England, and shook many tall sinners down upon their knees, there lived near this place a meagre miserly fellow of the name of Tom Walker.  He had a wife as miserly as himself; they were so miserly that they even conspired to cheat each other.  Whatever the woman could lay hands on she hid away; a hen could not cackle but she was on the alert to secure the new-laid egg.  Her husband was continually prying about to detect her secret hoards, and many and fierce were the conflicts that took place about what ought to have been common property.  They lived in a forlorn-looking house, that stood alone and had an air of starvation.  A few straggling savin trees, emblems of sterility, grew near it; no smoke ever curled from its chimney; no traveller stopped at its door.  A miserable horse, whose ribs were as articulate as the bars of a gridiron, stalked about a field where a thin carpet of moss, scarcely covering the ragged beds of pudding-stone, tantalized and balked his hunger; and sometimes he would lean his head over the fence, looked piteously at the passer-by, and seem to petition deliverance from this land of famine.

The house and its inmates had altogether a bad name.  Tom’s wife was a tall termagant, fierce of temper, loud of tongue, and strong of arm.  Her voice was often heard in wordy warfare with her husband; and his face sometimes showed signs that their conflicts were not confined to words.  No one ventured, however, to interfere between them; the lonely wayfarer shrunk within himself at the horrid clamor and clapper-clawing; eyed the den of discord askance, and hurried on his way, rejoicing, if a bachelor, in his celibacy.

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Tales of a Traveller from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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