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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 330 pages of information about Across China on Foot.

My thanks are due also to Mr. W. Brayton Slater and to my brother, Mr. W.R.  Dingle, for their kindness in having negotiated with my publishers in my absence in Inland China; and to the latter, for unfailing courtesy and patience, I am under considerable obligation.  “Across China on Foot” would have appeared in the autumn of 1910 had the printers’ proofs, which were several times sent to me to different addresses in China, but which dodged me repeatedly, come sooner to hand_.

[Signature:  Edwin Dingle]

Hankow, hupeh, China.

Across China on Foot

From the Straits to Shanghai

INTRODUCTORY

The scheme. Why I am walking across Interior China. Leaving Singapore. Ignorance of life and travel in China. The “China for the Chinese” cry. The New China and the determination of the Government. The voice of the people. The province of Yuen-nan and the forward movement. A prophecy. Impressions of Saigon. Comparison of French and English methods. At Hong-Kong. Cold sail up the Whang-poo. Disembarkation. Foreign population of Shanghai. Congestion in the city. Wonderful Shanghai.

Through China from end to end.  From Shanghai, 1,500 miles by river and 1,600 miles walking overland, from the greatest port of the Chinese Empire to the frontier of British Burma.

That is my scheme.

* * * * *

I am a journalist, one of the army of the hard-worked who go down early to the Valley.  I state this because I would that the truth be told; for whilst engaged in the project with which this book has mainly to deal I was subjected to peculiar designations, such as “explorer” and other newspaper extravagances, and it were well, perhaps, for my reader to know once for all that the writer is merely a newspaper man, at the time on holiday.

The rather extreme idea of walking across this Flowery Land came to me early in the year 1909, although for many years I had cherished the hope of seeing Interior China ere modernity had robbed her and her wonderful people of their isolation and antediluvianism, and ever since childhood my interest in China has always been considerable.  A little prior to the Chinese New Year, a friend of mine dined with me at my rooms in Singapore, in the Straits Settlements, and the conversation about China resulted in our decision then and there to travel through the Empire on holiday.  He, because at the time he had little else to do; the author, because he thought that a few months’ travel in mid-China would, from a journalistic standpoint, be passed profitably, the intention being to arrive home in dear old England late in the summer of the same year.

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