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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 216 pages of information about The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories.

One evening he was dining in the gardens, and the lady in the beret came up slowly to take the next table.  Her expression, her gait, her dress, and the way she did her hair told him that she was a lady, that she was married, that she was in Yalta for the first time and alone, and that she was dull there. . . .  The stories told of the immorality in such places as Yalta are to a great extent untrue; he despised them, and knew that such stories were for the most part made up by persons who would themselves have been glad to sin if they had been able; but when the lady sat down at the next table three paces from him, he remembered these tales of easy conquests, of trips to the mountains, and the tempting thought of a swift, fleeting love affair, a romance with an unknown woman, whose name he did not know, suddenly took possession of him.

He beckoned coaxingly to the Pomeranian, and when the dog came up to him he shook his finger at it.  The Pomeranian growled:  Gurov shook his finger at it again.

The lady looked at him and at once dropped her eyes.

“He doesn’t bite,” she said, and blushed.

“May I give him a bone?” he asked; and when she nodded he asked courteously, “Have you been long in Yalta?”

“Five days.”

“And I have already dragged out a fortnight here.”

There was a brief silence.

“Time goes fast, and yet it is so dull here!” she said, not looking at him.

“That’s only the fashion to say it is dull here.  A provincial will live in Belyov or Zhidra and not be dull, and when he comes here it’s ‘Oh, the dulness!  Oh, the dust!’ One would think he came from Grenada.”

She laughed.  Then both continued eating in silence, like strangers, but after dinner they walked side by side; and there sprang up between them the light jesting conversation of people who are free and satisfied, to whom it does not matter where they go or what they talk about.  They walked and talked of the strange light on the sea:  the water was of a soft warm lilac hue, and there was a golden streak from the moon upon it.  They talked of how sultry it was after a hot day.  Gurov told her that he came from Moscow, that he had taken his degree in Arts, but had a post in a bank; that he had trained as an opera-singer, but had given it up, that he owned two houses in Moscow. . . .  And from her he learnt that she had grown up in Petersburg, but had lived in S——­ since her marriage two years before, that she was staying another month in Yalta, and that her husband, who needed a holiday too, might perhaps come and fetch her.  She was not sure whether her husband had a post in a Crown Department or under the Provincial Council—­and was amused by her own ignorance.  And Gurov learnt, too, that she was called Anna Sergeyevna.

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