The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 266 pages of information about The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories.

They drove in at the factory gates.  On each side he caught glimpses of the little houses of workpeople, of the faces of women, of quilts and linen on the railings.  “Look out!” shouted the coachman, not pulling up the horses.  It was a wide courtyard without grass, with five immense blocks of buildings with tall chimneys a little distance one from another, warehouses and barracks, and over everything a sort of grey powder as though from dust.  Here and there, like oases in the desert, there were pitiful gardens, and the green and red roofs of the houses in which the managers and clerks lived.  The coachman suddenly pulled up the horses, and the carriage stopped at the house, which had been newly painted grey; here was a flower garden, with a lilac bush covered with dust, and on the yellow steps at the front door there was a strong smell of paint.

“Please come in, doctor,” said women’s voices in the passage and the entry, and at the same time he heard sighs and whisperings.  “Pray walk in. . . .  We’ve been expecting you so long . . . we’re in real trouble.  Here, this way.”

Madame Lyalikov—­a stout elderly lady wearing a black silk dress with fashionable sleeves, but, judging from her face, a simple uneducated woman—­looked at the doctor in a flutter, and could not bring herself to hold out her hand to him; she did not dare.  Beside her stood a personage with short hair and a pince-nez; she was wearing a blouse of many colours, and was very thin and no longer young.  The servants called her Christina Dmitryevna, and Korolyov guessed that this was the governess.  Probably, as the person of most education in the house, she had been charged to meet and receive the doctor, for she began immediately, in great haste, stating the causes of the illness, giving trivial and tiresome details, but without saying who was ill or what was the matter.

The doctor and the governess were sitting talking while the lady of the house stood motionless at the door, waiting.  From the conversation Korolyov learned that the patient was Madame Lyalikov’s only daughter and heiress, a girl of twenty, called Liza; she had been ill for a long time, and had consulted various doctors, and the previous night she had suffered till morning from such violent palpitations of the heart, that no one in the house had slept, and they had been afraid she might die.

“She has been, one may say, ailing from a child,” said Christina Dmitryevna in a sing-song voice, continually wiping her lips with her hand.  “The doctors say it is nerves; when she was a little girl she was scrofulous, and the doctors drove it inwards, so I think it may be due to that.”

They went to see the invalid.  Fully grown up, big and tall, but ugly like her mother, with the same little eyes and disproportionate breadth of the lower part of the face, lying with her hair in disorder, muffled up to the chin, she made upon Korolyov at the first minute the impression of a poor, destitute creature, sheltered and cared for here out of charity, and he could hardly believe that this was the heiress of the five huge buildings.

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The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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