The Party eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 210 pages of information about The Party.

A WOMAN’S KINGDOM

I

Christmas Eve

Here was a thick roll of notes.  It came from the bailiff at the forest villa; he wrote that he was sending fifteen hundred roubles, which he had been awarded as damages, having won an appeal.  Anna Akimovna disliked and feared such words as “awarded damages” and “won the suit.”  She knew that it was impossible to do without the law, but for some reason, whenever Nazaritch, the manager of the factory, or the bailiff of her villa in the country, both of whom frequently went to law, used to win lawsuits of some sort for her benefit, she always felt uneasy and, as it were, ashamed.  On this occasion, too, she felt uneasy and awkward, and wanted to put that fifteen hundred roubles further away that it might be out of her sight.

She thought with vexation that other girls of her age—­she was in her twenty-sixth year—­were now busy looking after their households, were weary and would sleep sound, and would wake up tomorrow morning in holiday mood; many of them had long been married and had children.  Only she, for some reason, was compelled to sit like an old woman over these letters, to make notes upon them, to write answers, then to do nothing the whole evening till midnight, but wait till she was sleepy; and tomorrow they would all day long be coming with Christmas greetings and asking for favours; and the day after tomorrow there would certainly be some scandal at the factory—­some one would be beaten or would die of drinking too much vodka, and she would be fretted by pangs of conscience; and after the holidays Nazaritch would turn off some twenty of the workpeople for absence from work, and all of the twenty would hang about at the front door, without their caps on, and she would be ashamed to go out to them, and they would be driven away like dogs.  And all her acquaintances would say behind her back, and write to her in anonymous letters, that she was a millionaire and exploiter —­that she was devouring other men’s lives and sucking the blood of the workers.

Here there lay a heap of letters read through and laid aside already.  They were all begging letters.  They were from people who were hungry, drunken, dragged down by large families, sick, degraded, despised . . . .  Anna Akimovna had already noted on each letter, three roubles to be paid to one, five to another; these letters would go the same day to the office, and next the distribution of assistance would take place, or, as the clerks used to say, the beasts would be fed.

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The Party from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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